The Crown of Thorns

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Religion and Spirituality  |  House: Booksie Classic

On Jesus Christ's Crown of Thorns

The Crown of Thorns

H.St.C

 

‘Hail, king of the Jews!’ they said” 

-Matthew 27:29

 

My devotion to the crown of thorns of Christ comes from what I perceive to be a suffering that Christ himself had suffered, of which could not be seen other for the crown of thorns directly pressed upon his head. Jesus, before he was tasked to carry the cross but after his flogging, was adorned with a crown of thorns. It would be painful, but it was not meant to be painful. It was meant to be a mockery, that the king of the jews and of all our hearts would have a crown of sharp, dried thorns instead of a proper crown. His coronation of the crown of thorns was clearly meant to degrade him as a sarcastic king- any good exegete would know and tell you this. But this crown of thorns gives me, at the very least personally, an insight of Christ's invisible suffering, of his mental suffering.

 

Our Lord, who was wholly Gos as He was wholly human, was indeed wholly human, and suffered all kinds of ails and aches- of body and mind, as would any human, to share more intimately in me and in all of us whom he so loves. The crown of thorns shows itself as a physical symbol of Christ's mental pains, of how the crown of irregular thorns juts out but also presses in. I see the one I love as someone who he loved so much in, that he sacrificed himself to save us. I see the one I love as one who loves so much, of love that is universally synonymous with pain, and persisted in this painful sorrow out of love, who persisted to love despite the sorrow. There is no doubt that Our Lord had suffered sorrows and felt them, for once again, He was as wholly human as He was wholly divine. Of physical pain and aches, He therefore must also have suffered aches and pains of the mind, mostly in sorrow of the thought of us whom He loves so much being led astray and further away from Him. 

 

In Matthew 9:4, the evangelist recounts Christ asking ‘(And Jesus seeing their thoughts, said:) Why do you think evil in your hearts?’. The context of this verse comes from Christ to a city and brought a man suffering from palsy to heal. He forgave his sins, from which the scribes mocked him for, saying that Christ was blasphemous for forgiving the man. Exegesis tells that this took place amongst the jews, who did not believe that Jesus Christ was God, and therefore they thought of Christ as blasphemous for forgiving in the place of God- for forgiving sins that they thought only Israel’s God, and not this man, could forgive. 

 

9 And entering into a boat, he passed over the water and came into his own city. 2 And behold they brought to him one sick of the palsy lying in a bed. And Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the man sick of the palsy: Be of good heart, son, thy sins are forgiven thee. 3 And behold some of the scribes said within themselves: He blasphemeth. 4 And Jesus seeing their thoughts, said: Why do you think evil in your hearts? 5 Whether is easier, to say, Thy sins are forgiven thee: or to say, Arise, and walk? 6 But that you may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then said he to the man sick of palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go into thy house. 7 And he arose, and went into his house. 8 And the multitude seeing it, feared, and glorified God that gave such power to men.

 

See on to this example, an allegory of the ages to come and that of our own, in which men, despite having been saved from sin by Chrsit’s sacrifice, continue to deny Him. This scenario seemed like a painful emotional scene for Christ, having spent His life healing the sick and performing miracles for the people whom He loves only to be mocked, doubted, and called blasphemous by them. I have a strong conviction that this was one of the many memories and one of the many sins Christ saw in His Agony in the Garden, which in catholic theology, Christ saw all of the sins of man that have been committed and are to be committed; past, present and future, which only added to his agony. I think this is especially relevant in our times, where suffering no longer comes in the physical, but comes in more commonly in a more intense sorrow of the mental and emotional. Where it is seen by so many instances of mental illness and death by suicide that the world’s physical comforts have been balanced out by the mental, emotional, and existential distress that clamps around all of our heads. Just as we all have our crosses to bear, we all have our crown of thorns to wear. But you do not suffer alone. The Lord who loves both me and you thought of all of us, all the ways we added weight to His cross, lashes to His back, and pressure to His crown of thorns, and He forgave and died for all them, for all of us- regardless.

 

The Agony of the Garden was the seed of the dried bush of Christ’s sorrows, which sprouted around His head in the form of a crown of thorns. The crown of thorns was just another form of suffering Christ so willingly suffered for us. Christ, your child is sad and alone, he feels pathetic and weak, and most of all- he feels unworthy of You. Let him caress Your crown of thorns and wipe the blood dripping down Your face to help him remember that You wore the crown of thorns for him, and in turn, must wear his own crown of thorns for You. Amen

 


Submitted: May 13, 2020

© Copyright 2021 Hugo de Santa Catarina. All rights reserved.

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