Impact of Disease in Slums

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Impact of Disease in Slums What are some of the Causal Factors?

Megacity slums are incubators of disease, and the response makes death tolls, even more troublesome. Some statistics of the percentage of slum populations to the total population is as follows: In — Rio, Brazil: 17%, Lagos, Nigeria: 75%, Dhaka, Bangladesh 40% Comparable numbers are reflected in other developing counties throughout the world. Common Conditions in these slum areas during health crises: lack of potable water no private bathrooms lack of handwashing stations, even soap lack of food lack of government involvement during health crises lack of medical facilities lack of medical coverage lack of money, especially for the poor to pay for slums are 10 times denser than other areas

Many developing countries have had a series of pandemics, as well as other disasters, war, and political unease. Although these countries have learned how to deal with these crises and even when governments, businesses, and civil societies have been involved, the needs are overwhelming. The risk is particularly high in slums because of the combination of poverty and poor planning. Countries that rely on assistance may not get what is required, because richer countries are dealing with the coronavirus epidemic as well, at this time.

Often governments have heavy-handed methods used against slum dwellers or no involvement at all. This leaves inhabitants at the ravage of diseases. These areas suffer disproportionately to other more suburban areas. A new Journal of Urban Health study recommends that developing countries facing infectious disease outbreaks prioritize getting water, good, and sanitation materials to their poorest residents.

If the governments don’t help, organized crime in the form of cartels and gangs deepens their grip on communities by handing out food and medical supplies.

Photo by Lu Avimitin on Unsplash

Africa has urbanized substantially in the last 11 years, and its slums have grown at break-neck speed. The head of the Africa centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC) has warned the coronavirus poses “ an existential threat to our continent”. Africa’s population, now 1.1 billion people, is expected to double by 2050, with up to 80% of that increase in cities, especially in slums says David Sanderson, professor and Inaugural Judity Nelson Chair in Architecture, UNSW.

These factors are reasons for providing necessary provision and housing for the poor, where the disease will not only affect all who live in these countries but the world as a whole.

Shirley Langton 2020


Submitted: June 18, 2020

© Copyright 2021 Shirley M. Langton. All rights reserved.

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