The Economy of Climate Change

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Romance  |  House: Booksie Classic


The Economy of Climate Change

Changes In Focus and Priority Are Necessary

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Investing in green infrastructure can jump-start the post-coronavirus economy. Also, other infrastructure is antiquated and failing. We need a plan which includes both natural and permanent structures in our future planning This will help reach climate change goals, as well as to make repairs to permanent infrastructure, which is 40% close to its expiration date.

Cities own 2/3 of infrastructure expense, so it is necessary for the federal government to contribute more to these improvements. At the moment, they are contributing the Gas Tax fund, which is only a one time offer. 

Since the coronavirus crisis, there will be more need for job creation, and vision is needed in the infrastructure repair and development areas. 

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Photograph: Trevor Pye, Unsplash

 

The green infrastructure sector, in Ontario, contributes over $8 billion to the national economy and over 120,000 jobs. 

In Sweden, natural assets are integrated into the national economy. This can increase climate change resiliency, and improve the air quality of communities.

In China, the adaptation of parks and green spaces, is adding to the countries ability to prevent flooding in the cities. Green space increases water storage, and decreases the need for sewage infrastructure, amount of water treatment, and stores carbon from the atmosphere.

In Gibson, BC, the local pond system, which cleans and filters the water, is included in the local government infrastructure system.

The planting of trees is a way of providing natural infrastructure. The 50 Million Tree Program, is a starting point of increasing natural infrastructure.

These ideas produce jobs, and add to our climate change goals says Michael Drescher, Associate Professor of the School of Planning, University of Waterloo, Ontario. 

Tiff Macklem, Dean and Professor of Finance, Rotman School of Management, a member of the Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance says that climate change should be part of regular saving and investment decisions if Canada is to meet its long-term goals of economic prosperity through the global transition to cleaner growth.

We need to focus on a transition to clean technology, and the market forces will do the rest. 

This starts with innovation and global competitiveness sector-by-sector.

This should include public and private sectors and tax incentives. Also to furthering climate change goals to include a period up to 2050, rather than 2030.With an associated capital plan that would spell out the scope and horizon of the opportunity very tangibly.

 

 


 

Shirley Langton 2020

 


Submitted: June 19, 2020

© Copyright 2021 Shirley M. Langton. All rights reserved.

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