The World's Hungry

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: August 01, 2020

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Submitted: August 01, 2020

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The World’s Hungry

Are We On Target, in Solving World Hunger?

1*gAFjeN_lVz1J53fsOawmjg.jpegPhotography: Pau Casals, Unsplash

Incredible strides have been made to eradicate hunger around the world since World War II. New technology, foreign aid, and a world economy have grown by 30 X, lifting hundreds of millions of people out of hunger and poverty. In 2018, we are still not on track although 191 UN member countries had a goal of ending world hunger by 2015. 

Because of conflict and climate change, we are losing ground. In 2019, 690 million people- 8.9% of the world’s population were undernourished. If you include people that are food insecure?—?the number goes up to over 2 billion. 

Women are more likely than men to face moderate to severe food insecurity. There is little progress in this area.

1*sIjoLZaVFK7Ap2rHHLUbFA.jpegPhotograph: Martin Jemberg, Unsplash


 

 

Close to 2 billion people suffer micronutrient malnutrition called hidden hunger. Children who suffer hidden hunger in early childhood, are less likely to complete their education, more likely to suffer from chronic disease, and are consequently less productive. Consequences include lower cognitive function. This affects their ability to escape poverty.

Most people can’t afford a nutritious diet. The current global poverty level is $1.90 US.

COVID-19 has made matters worse. It is adding 83–132 million more people who are under-nourished.

The world agrees that a plant-based diet is better for people. Richer countries have subsidies to make sure producers and consumers have what they need. In developing countries, they don’t have subsidies, funds, expertise and occasionally the political will to improve diets.  

Cheaper food sources may be all someone can afford, but farming methods may not be good for the land, eg. maize, and they are not good nutritionally. 

People’s access to food is usually determined by how much power is concentrated in the hands of the few. 


Fortification would help in the short-run, but healthy food should be a human right. Government policies are necessary to make that happen. 


Shirley Langton

 


© Copyright 2020 Shirley M. Langton. All rights reserved.

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