Horticulture of Words

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

A writer's portfolio is his true rose garden. He or she tends to his roses in his unique way aka style. Style, tone, portrayal, variety, and rhythm differ from writer to another like different music instruments playing notes for similar pieces. And that my friends depicts a writing process that shapes a piece of writing. Read along to find out more about your writing process

 
 
 
When people ask me what’s my writing process like all I can think of is Alice painting all the white roses red to appease the queen of hearts. As writers, we take a blank sheet of paper and flood it with intense thoughts and feelings that start the bleeding process to recruit a reader who can sense our shade of red. But the question that remains is what makes a writer write the way they write and what is it like for everyone?
 
Writing is a journey of self growth and exploration in a garden of truths guarded by a massive dragon we all fear. It is a garden with a myriad of floribondas that come in all shapes and sizes with or without thorns and even without scents at times. Hardship is its fertile soil with tears for a reliable water source, time for shears, comments for spades, criticism for hoes, and recognition for butterflies. But such a garden has many diseases mainly aphids of self doubt that drain its roses, repetition for maggots, and boredom for snails. As we move around our gardens, we learn to take care of them and grow the varieties we want. Sadly, not all roses yield rose-hips all year round or more roses than thorns especially, when we fail to play with and tame our garden’s dragon. Some call him “writer’s block” but I choose to see him for what he is: a reminder of integrity, individuality, and perspective. I admire this dragon because we are all small when we face him. He reminds us that status and ego can’t fill a page or snare a reader long enough to get past the first few lines. 
 
When we first enter our gardens, inspiration blows gusty winds to usher us in swaying our roses’ stamens to dance on lines that sing chimes of prime times under passion’s sun with fear’s clouds drawn apart. For a while, we feel passion’s sun warm our backs, strengthening our grip on our quills to till hardship’s soils to plant more roses hoping for hybrids, multi-colors, and thornless breeds. Alas! Even in a rose a garden, you can’t make a bed out of roses but sure instead you could prick your hands with thorns that will leave your hands red. I know so because I’ve been there trying forms and styles from roses I’ve never seen before thinking I could winterize them and make them an all season staple in my garden. I saw my neighbor do it and she encouraged me to join her in her attempts because it’s a theme submission we could both learn from and grow. Luckily for her, she was okay with growing a rose that was thornless but without a scent. I was too careful not to offend her taste by keeping my opinion to myself regarding scentless roses not being roses worth keeping. In the end of the day, I realized, my garden might not be a home to a myriad of floribondas but I am proud of my damasks that grew over time as I aged drinking gratitude’s wine.
 
Working in my garden, I stopped seeing it as a field of mass production or a shooting location for a merry occasion or even an escape from a sad reality. I stopped seeing writing- my garden- as a personal narrative because I found in it a common ground for more beings like me who are still struggling to find balance and an opportunity to create a meaning in this life. Trials soils, showed me that roses don’t grow from imported seeds and those cuttings from other fields have lesser yields. Sometimes you need to groom what you grow you and use what you have to create the best variation you know you can sustain.
 
Many times, I find myself trapped behind the door the dragon guards in my garden, preventing me from leaving. The good news is, I am no longer angry by his presence because I know his askance will only enrich my garden by teaching me how to find the bits of me that have fallen and how to embrace those bits that grew with time. It saddens me when I still hear rules for gardening that many pass around like a one size fits all from show not tell to  do not use the “I” narrative and those of I do not accept previously published works including those that you only publish on your blog. If you must know why that makes me sad, it’s because no two roses even on the same rose tree are alike. Every rose blooms and stands in a different pose when faced by passion’s sun but as always beauty is in the eyes of the beholder if and only if the beholder opens his eyes and turns his head to all directions. How can you see beauty if you are busy supervising others on duty? Tending to a garden is never a duty in the sense of obligation because tending to a writer’s garden is a lifestyle that only dies when the writer himself dies. I am a newbee in the gardening business with lots of rice to eat so that I can grow strong and keep writing and working in my garden but it doesn’t mean I don’t get to have a say or I do less than those in their gardens for many years before me. 
 
When choosing topics for my garden, I always think of my roses’ well being and harmony. It pays to write about things you can relate to and know very well because a visitor/reader can judge with one look what type of gardener you are. Many don’t really care if all your roses are uniform or what form you prune them in. Font and format matter for those who submit to agents or websites with guidelines but if you are sharing something on your blog or website, then feel free to be creative and carefree. It takes a while to transplant an impression or cutting as I like to call it into themes along submission lines without taking the risk of losing visitors. In the process, you could experience a dilution of genre, identity, voice and of course a dragged narrative drugged with overused themes drowned with faux pas lists. In the end, we grow our roses from within our souls, experiences, identities, and cultures. 
 
Having a garden and bearing the title of gardener of words, can also be a rosy experience if you go to the right expos where everyone gets to show their roses and get a slice of that luscious appreciation cake we call recognition. Sometimes, a comment is all the sprinkles and icing your rose can earn for your cake and that’s the best take dedication can bake. See what begins as a hobby can become worthy of being someone’s life story. After all, a garden is nothing without its gardener for its beauty lies in the hands of its owner. We all grow things in our gardens differently but that doesn’t mean that we get the same number of visitors yearly or that we garden badly because we have fewer visitors. 
 
So next time, you get a theme to write walk into your garden and look into the faces of your roses. Get closer to their petals and appreciate the dew on them before you decide to use a spade or hoe to transplant your new cutting. Make sure that your new floribonda matches your soil and your quill is apt to brush its petals in vivid red. Don’t try to copy others you’ve read or visited their gardens because each garden is a different soul waiting for someone to see it as whole. Gardens only perish when a gardener forgets to relish its beauty. It is what it is: life ain’t a bed of roses and writing is a rose garden that offers no bed under passion’s sun. So if I were you put your hat on your head and watch where you tread but always hold your heart’s thread! I will catch you later, I’m done with this plot of roses. See you in the next plot. 
 
 
 
#writing  #WritingCommunity #mentalblock  #writers #writerslife #creativewriting #roses #horticulture #expermintalwriting #style #selfdiscovery


Submitted: October 17, 2020

© Copyright 2020 pasithea chan. All rights reserved.

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