Michelle's Method #13: On Power, Feminism, and Hollywood

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

My take on what is wrong with modern feminism, Hollywood, and perceptions of power in the media.

Michelle’s Method #14: My Take on Hollywood, the Women’s Movement, and Power

 

She-La, 54-40

 

Gonna start dressing

Finer things

Maybe just nothing

Maybe just a dream

 

You are gonna find him one day knockin at your door

He's not the hero any more

He says baby don't you want me in your life

You tell him what is wrong, not right

 

Don't She La

Don't she look happy

Don't She La

Don't she look happy

 

Gonna start living

Fantasy

Maybe just nothing

Maybe just a dream

 

Fire in the blue sky when he hits you in the mouth

This the war and not the warning

He says baby I love you won't you stay

You say good-bye to him too late

 

Don't She La

Don't she look happy

Don't She La

Don't she look happy

Don't she look happy now

That hes gone away from here

Hes gone away he died they say an awful way

It was attack of the heart

 

What do 54-40, Leah Remini, Rose McGowan, the ‘victims’ of Jeffrey Epstein (in particular Mrs. Guiffrey), Marissa Barbieri, and fans of Gia Carangi all have in common? Nothing on the surface beside the claim ‘entertainment’? Right. Wrong. They all perpetuate the myth of the unwilling, innocent victim and claim it as part of feminism 101. 

 

The victims of Epstein were often willing and complicit in their desire to trade sex for economic benefits. They were not like victims of hardcore pornography and prostitution. In their complaining, much of their attitude is similar to Holly Madison and her involvement with Hugh Hefner, which culminated in a book about her life and her stay at the Playboy Mansion. 


True feminists do not trade on sex or their looks for men’s money. They start businesses, travel, play sports, do fundraising, write books, get degrees, take on new hobbies, start and end relationships, raise children with another or own their own. True feminists do not play the victim card. They also do not espouse racist, homophobic, or classist values that are common today in victim feminism.

 

The fans of Gia Carangi forever portray her as a victim of the fashion industry. For those unfamiliar, she was a bisexual/gay supermodel who died tragically of AIDs in 1986. She was also a harasser of women who sexually assaulted them in hotel rooms on modeling trips, but that part is left-out. Their usual ‘truth’ about her biography was that her mother and the fashion industry were to blame for her contraction of HIV and use of intravenous drugs. No mention is made of a horrid rape by a drug dealer, sharing of needles in galleries, or involvement in prostitution due to poverty and homelessness. 

 

The industry that tolerated her behavior until it could not take it any longer is now to blame for poor life decisions and personal problems. Grated, I have enormous sympathy and understanding towards anyone with HIV, but putting the blame on parents and an industry is ludicrous at best and highly irresponsible at worst. 

 

The stories put forth about her are hypocritical and deny how she stalked Sandy Linter, her makeup artist, once injected her with drugs against her will, and stole constantly. She also got into fights with a girlfriend, Elisha, and most of the books and stories about her, including so-called documentaries, leave out the unpleasant details about the woman’s life. Lying should never be acceptable in the media and journalism.

 

I am disappointed by the glorification of victim feminism over the last twenty years. Feminism started off as a movement that demanded equality in divorce, family law, voting rights, reproductive rights, and other areas. Let me be clear, I am very supportive of power feminism as espoused by Camille Paglia, Katie Roiphe, and others. They do not constantly perpetuate the myth that women are victims. 

 

Feminism during its fourth wave has become rather cumbersome, narrow-minded, white, elitist, homophobic, racist, out of touch with the working class, elitist, and uninterested in women’s financial concerns as well as their access to career and education resources. It is not surprising that due to this type of feminism, women still make thirty to forty percent less than men. For black women, it is fifty percent less than white men. 

 

Feminism is not wrong to support “Me Too” or “Time’s Up”, but let’s consider that McGowan betrayed the very movement she claimed to start, though the movement was actually started by someone else, a black woman. Now, I don’t mean anything by this, but the woman who founded these movements was not attractive or taken seriously. Rose McGowan and all the other attractive, white, small, thin, cute, and established actors were taken seriously. There is a correlation.

 

As you can see by the 54 40 song about domestic violence, the songwriter is very preoccupied by a beautiful and troubled woman who cannot extricate herself from a bad situation. This is typical of the male perception of who counts as a victim/survivor and who doesn’t. A less attractive woman with the same problem, who had the strength to extricate herself from it, would not get any support, interest, respect, or understanding from men. 

 

This has to do with the damsel in distress viewpoint of women. If there is a hot woman who can’t help herself but needs to be saved, then a man must come to her rescue. This notion is an age-old myth and plays on male sexual fantasy, chivalry, the supposed weakness of women, double standards, and devaluation of feminine strength. It was created by the patriarchy and should be dismantled by the feminist movement.

 

However, the racist-classist-homophobic feminist movement of today shuts out less acceptable women and helps to recycle these old myths via the obsession with attractive white women’s problems. That is not to conclude their claims of rape, harassment, stalking, and exploitation are invalid or that it was wrong to step up and do something about those issues. It is more to point out how the media and society along with feminist ‘leaders’ have cut themselves off from grassroots power feminism (2nd wave feminism) in favor of today’s victim feminism. None of the victims in this group were gay, working class, unemployed, black, disabled, over the age of fifty, employees of the accused, or from an ethnic minority background. It is hard to respect a movement that does not include everyone. 


Of course, no explanation has ever been offered why nobody ever bothered to back the original founder of the movement in 2007 and why she was not considered the instigator of the movement. She had the guts to stand up to her abuser and harasser. The others waited seven to thirty years. While they did the right thing, it is the original founder of the Me Too and Time’s Up movement who really deserves respect and support. 

 

Granted, a foundation has been created to help women who are victims of harassment and other injustices in Hollywood and that is a good thing for young and upcoming actors. Let’s hope they drop the victim mentality from these stars and complainers about Scientology, a religion they are free to join and leave. That would do feminism more a service than disservice.

 


Submitted: November 30, 2020

© Copyright 2021 michelle's method. All rights reserved.

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