9 seconds or less

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

9 seconds or less is a short story about how a boxing athlete face adversity and what can we learn from that experience. it is the chapter 1 of the book -anecdotes-

Chapter 1

9 Seconds or less

 

Even if you're not a boxing fan, like I am, you may have seen a boxing match. Two gladiators steps up into a ring to win a battle in the only sport that you don't ''play" but instead you fight.

The battle starts and is all strategies, punches, sweat and blood. During a fight, many times, a boxer can receive a hard hit and falls down (knocked down). The referee will pause the fight but the time is still running and he will start a counting. The wounded boxer has 9 seconds to recover and get back on his feet. If the boxer can't stand up before 10 seconds, he or she loses the fight. But if the boxer can, the fight continues. A boxer can receive another strike and fall down again and still won't lose if he can get up in 9 seconds or less.

When a boxer gets knocked down, a lot of things are happening to him in those seconds. Dizziness blurred vision, pam, noises everywhere, disorientation. Sometimes the blow can be so hard that the boxer don't feel any pain because his brain just shoots down and lose consciousness. And if this is not enough, his self-esteem starts to drop as he not only knows is in disadvantage but also he feels that winning the fight is becoming a task that could be beyond his possibilities. There are just too many things happening on such a short period of time.

So, to get up, keep fighting and do whatever he can to win, the boxer needs simple tasks. Even with all the surrounding noise, every boxer makes an effort to listen but only to his corner. Yes. In that corner as you can imagine are the only very few people, that can help him. He relies most of his possibilities of winning on those who trained, mentored, prepared and advised him. At  that moment of desperation, any good trainer, the best ones, will shout at the boxer to stay down until he has used most of those 9 seconds he has available before getting back on his feet.

It seems so obvious. The boxer needs to take a break. He needs time to recover not only from the physical damage, but the biggest challenge in that particular moment is the damage done to his confidence. It will be required a strong mentality to believe in himself to make a comeback and win.

Even if the boxer doesn't recover all his confidence, one thing is for sure. He needs to stand up. He needs to keep fighting. This is no time for strategies, for hearing the crowd, to think on what just had happened.  This time is only to take a break, to recover strength and to stand up like an unbeatable warrior. By standing up the boxer is making a powerful statement. There is nothing that makes a rival feel more frustrated and powerless than knowing he has no way to hurt a boxer that won't give up until he succeeds.

The fight will continue and even following the corners instructions (trainers) it's the boxer and his own knowledge that will help him keep fighting, taking right decisions and adjusting the strategy in a matter of seconds to find that small edge over his rival, take the chance to overcome and win. Some of the most dramatic comebacks ever seen started just that moment, by standing up on those 9 seconds or less.


Submitted: December 16, 2020

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Short Story / Non-Fiction