The Arctic

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I wasn't really reasearching the Arctic, but I came across some information that's worth sharing.

The Arctic

I’m going to have difficulty making this and interesting read, but the story of it starts with a search for a past local event among old newspapers and on the very page I was looking at, I saw a headline about the Arctic and jotted a note about it on my pad. That evening a nature documentary played on television which showed a sped-up view of how the Arctic ice was melting at an ‘alarming rate’ due to climate change. It looked like it was taken from a satellite, but maybe it was an animation, but here they were doing the subtle thing of promoting the effects of climate change. I’m no follower of the Gore doctrine or how the IPCC contributes to the UN’s Agenda 21, but I listen. Anyway I decided to go back to the old newspapers to see what might turn up about the Arctic. I’ve listed it as I found it, a bit random, so unless you’re interested, you might be better to cast your attention elsewhere. The notes aren’t chronological in any way, and I’ve converted the temperatures because they were all in Fahrenheit, and the UN works with Celsius.

1937. Arctic is warmer, tropics cooler. Prof V. Vize: Where the Arctic meets the Atlantic Ocean, the mean annual temperature has risen by 1.1?C in 17 years.

January 1926. Arctic conditions in Spain. Temperatures were as low as -19.4?C.

January 1928. Stefansson – explorer notes – Annual snowfall in Virginia exceeds the annual snowfall at the North Pole. Summer temperatures in the Arctic Circle commonly reach 29?C and occasionally 37?C. Kentucky bluegrass grows up the Northern reaches of the Arctic Circle. In Iceland the January temperature is the same as in Milan, Italy. The 25 year low Arctic temperature was -48?C which is 7?C warmer than parts of Montana in the winter.

February 1926. Changes in climate. C.E. Brooks M.Sc: The Ice Age ended about 6500 BC leaving the Arctic Ocean filled with floating ice. Around 4000 BC a (sea floor) depression in the North Atlantic regions allowed a flood of warm water into the Arctic Ocean and the ice cap disappeared. A period of dry climate set in with moderate winters and hot summers. By 1500 BC world sea levels had risen to three metres above present. About 850 BC temperatures cooled and the Arctic became glacial again, and after 100 BC the Arctic ice cap gradually broke up although, except for a brief time in the seventh century, it did not entirely disappear. A second renewal of the ice cap began about 1000 AD which was definitely associated by less sunspot activity. Recent calculations reveal that air temperature at the North Pole of -18?C (-0.4?F) in January, which is produced entirely by the ice. Without the influence of ice, the midwinter temperature would be, -3?C (26.6?F).

March 1923. World’s hot places – Record at Death Valley – The Arctic is not exempt. The US Weather Bureau substation at Greenland Ranch, California was the hottest place in the US on July 10 1913. The temperature was 56.6?C (133.9?F), the highest ever recorded anywhere in the world with a test thermometer. In the Arctic and along the Alaskan coast, 38?C is not uncommon while during summer 27?C is quite common. For comparison, 49? C was recorded in Broom Australia.

13 February 1940. Winter conditions grip Central and Northern Europe. In Holland temperatures were -34?C and 50 vessels were icebound in Norway with East Norway temperatures at -46?C.

4 July 1929. Exploding myths - Arctic fallacies -Heat at the Pole. Dr. Stefansson talking to John T. Brady of the Boston Post. The North Pole is the farthest point from the equator, so is assumed to be the coldest place. At Havre, Montana, -56?C has been recorded, yet at the North Pole the temperature has never dipped below -51?C.

31 May 1947. Mysterious warming of climate in the Arctic regions If the Antarctic and the ice regions of Greenland should reduce at the present rate, oceanic surfaces will rise to catastrophic proportions. Dr Ahlmann said temperatures in the Arctic had risen 5.5?C since 1900. He pointed out that in 1910 the navigable season along the Western Spitzbergen coast lasted three months, but now (1947) it lasts for eight.

It’s fairly clear that Arctic ice has had its ups and downs and it’s interesting to note that if Brookes was right, there was no ice in the Arctic for a long time, yet polar bears, have survived to tell the tale. We can look at graphs, and listen to predictions, but the written word somehow brings to life what conditions were like in the past, and I have to confess this exercise has taught me a lot.

One more thing… mentioning the cold. This greenhouse theory ‘that everyone understands’ is based on heat getting into a glasshouse and cannot escape. The mental image is that there’s a gaseous blanket wrapped around the planet keeping the heat in. At the top of the troposphere, about 10 kilometres up is, the ozone layer, but it’s unclear – well at least I couldn’t find the information – where the layer of carbon dioxide and methane actually is. So it’s perfectly logical that a certain amount of Earth’s heat does escape into space. The most significant greenhouse gas is water vapour, and clouds happen to be in layers, hence the term, blanketed in clouds. Clouds make the difference between a warm day and a cool day. The highest type of cloud is cirrus, occurring at 6 kilometres. International passenger aircraft fly at up to 7 kilometres, and if you’ve noticed, up there the temperature is -50?C. We all know that hot air rises, so where’s the heat?

 

 

 

 


Submitted: February 06, 2021

© Copyright 2021 moa rider. All rights reserved.

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