Contemporary psychotherapy from a first-person perspective

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Romance  |  House: Booksie Classic

meant to make it 'non-fiction', not 'romance', not that it matters

Contemporary psychotherapy from a first-person perspective

The patient (be careful of using that word because some people are sensitive to it). Ahem… the person enters the dimly lit and stuffy office. The first thing he (…oops! Be careful of using gender pronouns because some people are sensitive to it.)

Ahem… the first thing the person notices upon entering that dingy and musty old shabby hoarder’s shack of an office are the freshly polished certificates of accomplishment covering as much breadth as possible of the wall behind the practitioner. The practitioner never looks upon these in the presence of the patient (the seal is broken, may as well say whatever I want now), only alone with a box of tissues.

The implication is all. The implication is that the practitioner is smarter than the patient, and everything the patient says is either stupid or relevant to a pathological diagnosis. When the therapist makes what he believes to be an important observation he will write something down in his notes as the patient sits there watching and wondering what he is writing down. This invariably happens many times throughout the course of a normal session, creating detachment of the kind that is not often helpful in therapy, one would think.

In stark contrast to the pretentious display of degrees and other accolades giving the practitioner the unambiguous right to be snarky and bombastic, dust and grime covered books and other ornaments are displayed all around, ostensibly to give the appearance of a learned or useful atmosphere.

But the atmosphere is anything but learned or useful. The smile of the practitioner is always somehow both smug and apathetic. He will talk in tautological jargon learned many years prior and the only advances to his knowledge he made since were in rendering his speech more patronising and mastering the art of gaslighting. Because it’s certainly not about whether he even understands what he’s saying. You’re the nutcase, remember? Maybe he thinks he’s actually helping. But ultimately one can be sure it’s only about the money.

At this point the patient, who came to this place, incredibly, with both an open mind and an open wallet, is given the vague impression that he is surrounded by eggshells which should certainly not be trodden upon lest the ego of the practitioner is challenged, and the life of the patient made unnecessarily harder.

Unfortunately, this patient, like all the others, came with the expectation of receiving help. Like all the other times he experienced almost this exact event, it was to no avail, and he left feeling even more vulnerable and helpless than before. But hey, $450/hour is pretty good pay. You should be happy for your therapist. He matters more than you, after all. This authority helps people and is worthy of respect. You’re afflicted and avoidable. What does your perspective matter? Authorities are trustworthy, right? /s

(Really starting to wonder if the people in question are actual lizards and are therefore being approximated to a human or an entity with human-like qualities is offensive. Therefore, dehumanise your characters to better appeal to lizards. It works in mental health care wards, doesn’t it?)


Submitted: April 03, 2021

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