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Topic: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

Hellooo! I see that there's been no recent posts, so I just wanted to get something started.

I like The Selection series by Kiera Cass. Many have called in juvenile. It's criticized for being character-driven, and the lead protagonist infuriates many for flip-flopping between two young men because she's in a love triangle. The writing certainly isn't praised since it's rather vague. The second book was seen as unnecessary and the ending to the third book came off as very sudden with so many conveniences it felt forced, according to critical readers. Technically speaking, the story did not call for a trilogy, which was a clear cash-grab. It could have been completed as a single, 500 paged book.

I can certainly see their viewpoints, and I don't disagree at all. I read the book expecting to be able to laugh at it since everyone I knew said it was one of the worst books they had read. Instead, I found the series to be one of the cutest, funny romance stories I've come across, and considering I finished it only a week ago (as opposed to 5 years ago), I know I'm going to love it for a long time.




So, what Young Adult book do you love that most people seem to hate? Or something people may sneer at as juvenile or amateur? is there something that you should technically dislike if you judge it by your own critical standards, but you like it anyway?

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

I can't think of any the I love, but most hates.

Actually, it's the opposite for me. There are some really popular books out there that e.g. a lot of BookTubers rave about that I really dislike.
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell and Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Mass was not my cup of tea at all.
The stories felt falt and so predictable.
It's the only books I've read by these authors, and I will not ever pick up a book written by either of them again.
I also tried reading Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, I gave that up after a few chapters. It was just so boring and cliché in a bad way that I could not get through it.

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

Maria Jo wrote:

I can't think of any the I love, but most hates.

Actually, it's the opposite for me. There are some really popular books out there that e.g. a lot of BookTubers rave about that I really dislike.
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell and Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Mass was not my cup of tea at all.
The stories felt falt and so predictable.
It's the only books I've read by these authors, and I will not ever pick up a book written by either of them again.
I also tried reading Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, I gave that up after a few chapters. It was just so boring and cliché in a bad way that I could not get through it.

I guess that works too!

I didn't care much for the Hunger Games, which everyone hyped about. I definitely don't hate it, and it's a good book to give to a classroom of kids who refuse to read How to Kill a Mockingbird (which how I came across it at the time), but I was much more interested in the history of the Hunger Games as opposed to Katniss' social problems. "I'm awkward." "I'm not good at making friends". I understand, but can I learn more about Panem now? To be fair, the lack of real history is explained by the setting of the book. I can see the book being a nice introduction to dystopian type stories, and nothing in it is offensive.

I've heard of Sarah J. Maas. I actually follow this blog (Bad Books Good Times!) that reviews books which are recommended based on how bad their audience believes them to be. They review it chapter by chapter, so it's a bit like spark notes with some snark. And gifs, of course. They're reviewing Maas' fae series, published some time after her Throne of Glass one. They’re on her third book. I can see the trouble.

Rainbow Rowell's pen name sounds fantastic, though (no pun intended)! big_smile I think I've actually heard of all of these before. There are some fairly-popular BookTubers who have made videos on, "Books I Hate That Everyone Else Loves".

Thank you for sharing smile

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

Esha Sirshei wrote:

I didn't care much for the Hunger Games, which everyone hyped about. I definitely don't hate it, and it's a good book to give to a classroom of kids who refuse to read How to Kill a Mockingbird (which how I came across it at the time), but I was much more interested in the history of the Hunger Games as opposed to Katniss' social problems. "I'm awkward." "I'm not good at making friends". I understand, but can I learn more about Panem now? To be fair, the lack of real history is explained by the setting of the book. I can see the book being a nice introduction to dystopian type stories, and nothing in it is offensive.

I loved the first and second book in The Hunger Games. They are one of the book series that I've read multiple times.
It's the inspiration behind the books, mixed with the thrill of the games - both action and interlectual - that I really like about them (and I'm a sucker for an underdog character).

The third book, which wasn't centered around a game but actually gave a lot more insight into the history of Panem, wasn't as gripping to me. Which, now that I think about it, is odd. Because something that I love so much about the Harry Potter universe is the history, which I just want to learn more about.
It is just so fascinating how some people are able to create these alternate realities in such details, like J.K.Rowling, J. R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, Patrick Rothfuss, George Lucas, etc.

I've created very detailed characters for my story, including their family and history (much more than I will ever need in the book). But I haven't taken on the task of creating an entirely new/alternative reality as well. My story takes place in New York City...
I take my hat off for those who have a mind that can create an entire world as well. It's a really big and wonderful talent. And it must be so much fun making a big pretend world like that. smile

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

Maria Jo wrote:
Esha Sirshei wrote:

I didn't care much for the Hunger Games, which everyone hyped about. I definitely don't hate it, and it's a good book to give to a classroom of kids who refuse to read How to Kill a Mockingbird (which how I came across it at the time), but I was much more interested in the history of the Hunger Games as opposed to Katniss' social problems. "I'm awkward." "I'm not good at making friends". I understand, but can I learn more about Panem now? To be fair, the lack of real history is explained by the setting of the book. I can see the book being a nice introduction to dystopian type stories, and nothing in it is offensive.

I loved the first and second book in The Hunger Games. They are one of the book series that I've read multiple times.
It's the inspiration behind the books, mixed with the thrill of the games - both action and interlectual - that I really like about them (and I'm a sucker for an underdog character).

The third book, which wasn't centered around a game but actually gave a lot more insight into the history of Panem, wasn't as gripping to me. Which, now that I think about it, is odd. Because something that I love so much about the Harry Potter universe is the history, which I just want to learn more about.
It is just so fascinating how some people are able to create these alternate realities in such details, like J.K.Rowling, J. R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, Patrick Rothfuss, George Lucas, etc.

I've created very detailed characters for my story, including their family and history (much more than I will ever need in the book). But I haven't taken on the task of creating an entirely new/alternative reality as well. My story takes place in New York City...
I take my hat off for those who have a mind that can create an entire world as well. It's a really big and wonderful talent. And it must be so much fun making a big pretend world like that. smile

I never read the second nor third book of Hunger Games, but the concept of the second one is really cool, what with the clockwork-like zones. I did like book one more than the movie (Katniss' struggles didn't translate to movie that well).
It's interesting that you didn't ebjoy Collins going into the history in the third book much as compared to other series. Was it because you didn't expect it, since one and two had a very specific setting? It sounds like the majority of three was Katniss being sidelined in her own story underground while being used as a mascot for a rebellion she isn't involved in until the ending. The plot hunted her in one and two as opposed to three. Do you always read book three along with one and two?

As someone who's been working on a series for a decade now, with a universe that has over 15 worlds I have to individualize, on top of languages, cultures, and mixed species, it truly is fun big_smile. Infuriating, but fun.
Actually, one of the reasons I don't seek out books with great world-building is because I don't want anything from their works showing up in mine (it's just that for school, I HAD to read Hunger Games, so it might as well have had something more), so while I don't like how vague Young Adult novels can be, I only let myself read them because they're uuusually vague with their worlds. It's one of the main reasons I've never touched J.R.R Tolkien's books. No Martin, no Rowling, and no reading detailed reviews on them, either.

I'm opposite from you when it comes to what I've taken on to write. I really admire how people can create a fascinating story set in the real world. I can't do that. I find fantasy easy, but if you say no fantasy, no paranormal, I'm at a complete loss. I can't get a title for the book, I can't get a beginning, an ending, nothing. I have no idea how writers manage to make the fictional real world more intriguing than the real world you're actually living in, but they do, and it's great. I'm floored each time xD

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

Esha Sirshei wrote:

I never read the second nor third book of Hunger Games, but the concept of the second one is really cool, what with the clockwork-like zones. I did like book one more than the movie (Katniss' struggles didn't translate to movie that well).
It's interesting that you didn't ebjoy Collins going into the history in the third book much as compared to other series. Was it because you didn't expect it, since one and two had a very specific setting? It sounds like the majority of three was Katniss being sidelined in her own story underground while being used as a mascot for a rebellion she isn't involved in until the ending. The plot hunted her in one and two as opposed to three. Do you always read book three along with one and two?

As someone who's been working on a series for a decade now, with a universe that has over 15 worlds I have to individualize, on top of languages, cultures, and mixed species, it truly is fun big_smile. Infuriating, but fun.
Actually, one of the reasons I don't seek out books with great world-building is because I don't want anything from their works showing up in mine (it's just that for school, I HAD to read Hunger Games, so it might as well have had something more), so while I don't like how vague Young Adult novels can be, I only let myself read them because they're uuusually vague with their worlds. It's one of the main reasons I've never touched J.R.R Tolkien's books. No Martin, no Rowling, and no reading detailed reviews on them, either.

I'm opposite from you when it comes to what I've taken on to write. I really admire how people can create a fascinating story set in the real world. I can't do that. I find fantasy easy, but if you say no fantasy, no paranormal, I'm at a complete loss. I can't get a title for the book, I can't get a beginning, an ending, nothing. I have no idea how writers manage to make the fictional real world more intriguing than the real world you're actually living in, but they do, and it's great. I'm floored each time xD

Haha! That so funny how we're all so different. I just don't have a mind that will create fantasy. Sadly, because I love to read it. Especially high fantasy, which it sounds like you're creating.


The story I'm focusing on and trying to (finally) finish has a lot of elements that takes their inspirations from my own life. I could have wished for a less eventful life but, alas, that is not something we can always controle. But I'm spicing it up with elements that I just made up too. It's YA romance/family/drama with some dark themes.

Another story my mind has made up is completely different. It's sort of an action/comedy/thriller-thing. But it's far to inspired by other stories. So I will never try to get it out apart from maybe here, on the Internet.

And the last idea bobbing around in my head is a twist between present day and historical fiction. Think along the style of The Neverending Story or The Notebook, but set in the real world, jumping between today and the late 18th century.

So yeah, my imagination goes in every direction, but it's all within our reality.


– I think the reason why I was disappointed by the thrid book, was because the "Games" had been taken out, and it was the whole concept surrounding them, I loved about the other books. I wanted to see more of that.
If I like the first book in a series, I'd like to ready the next straight away. So I'm very (im)patiently waiting for the third and last book in the Kingkiller Chronicle. I love that series so much! Give my the last book, but if not that, then the movie or TV show based on the series that they are working on. Just give my something! big_smile

But wow... that is quite a task you have thrown yourself into. Not only creating one world, but OVER 15...! You are one crazy individual, and I mean that in the most positive way. Because to be very "inside your own mind" to come up with all that.

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Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

I know! I don't think I can do ANY other genre, honestly, other than Fantasy. Paranormal, I haven't actually tried it, because my Fantasy pretty much always has paranormal elements. And I'm a big believer of ghosts, too, so I also think of them reality. Yeah.

I love when YA really focuses on family. I'm surprised at how little do (or maybe I just fail to come across it?). Having romance in it makes it better, too. I've found that if a story focuses solely on family, or solely on romance, it can be a big hit or miss, but mixing the two can really pull things together, and I enjoy it much more. Are you almost done? I see you have 2 chapters, but is it safe to assume you have more than what's posted?
Stories jumping between timelines are the best big_smile. You get a 2-in-1 that end up playing into each other.

I can understand that. I usually refuse to touch a series of any type--book series, or movie series--until it's all done. I don't want to love the beginning, and then find out the ending completely falls apart and its entire audience unanimously agrees. A finished series is a safety net, and also a way of letting me blow through the story and not wait. Waiting is on a good story is the worst. Well...second to actually having to write it, I guess. That's different though when it's a story on a writing community site, mostly because there's actually contact with the author themselves and you can go through each chapter with them.

Oh, wow, I didn't recognize the series name at all but when I read the synopsis of the Kingkiller Chronicle, I remembered the name Kvuoth (I am not spelling that right at all, but I also don't want to open up the same tab again). Someone gave me that book once, and since it was back when I despised reading and it gave me a headache, I never even touched the first page. It's somewhere in this house. Is there a set date for the third book? Hopefully it's not undetermined yikes

I've never been clear on the levels of fantasy. What would high fantasy be? I've always thought of it as a feeling. Some things can have spells and an entire high magic system, but at the same time, feel casual to a point that it feels like low fantasy to me? If that makes sense.

I shall definitely take crazy as a compliment in this case wink

8 (edited by Ragulose 2019-08-26 12:38:20)

Re: What YA book do you love that most people hate?

People like what they like, we are all different i did not like Hunger games either but i would never tell someone not to read it, try it for yourself. if we all liked the same thing, it would be a boring world. I dislike critics many say if they dislike something; it is a waste of time or some crap like that. i like people when they say this was not for me, or something. put the focus on them not for someone else. letting people know you dislike something is fine but do not tell people they will not like it. at the same time, we should not fall into that trap and let them make up our minds.We might mess something good, book, TV show/movie, music; ;; do not let someone control what you think, do, or like, find out for yourself.