On Unoriginality

Reads: 224  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 3

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
An essay conveying the frustrations of reading Booksie novels.

Submitted: May 19, 2009

A A A | A A A

Submitted: May 19, 2009

A A A

A A A


After being a member of Booksie for a number of months, I have grown weary of reading novels that lack any sort of originality. I have found common themes in many of the Featured Writing works, which have invoked feelings of utter frustration and a thirst for something new and refreshing.

The type of novel I witness most often is that of the typical teenage female, one who yearns for something she cannot obtain, whether it be popularity or the returned affections of a crush. The young, female protagonist then undergoes a process of serious self-pity, in which she might experience a series of grave disappointments. This may include a long-awaited phone call in which the protagonist’s crush admits that he is not interested in her, or perhaps not being invited to a highly anticipated social event. Novels such as these often end comically; the young, protagonist obtains her heart’s desire and all is well.

I feel that these novels are but the childish musings of inexperienced authoresses who write about their deepest desires; fourteen-year-old girls who gain popularity through their characters, not in reality. While it is often encouraged to write about one’s experiences, I feel that some of the best work is brought forth when authors are forced to place themselves in a completely different character’s position. If I could suggest anything to young, teenage authors, it’s to first become a well-read individual. Doing so would not only help strengthen your grammar and spelling abilities, but would also give you a heightened sense of awareness when it comes to making your work your own original work, not the same story of a pitiful teenage girl’s quest for love or popularity found all throughout Booksie.

I encourage young authors to rise above the humdrum world of social workings and bring your work to a much more mature, interesting, and impressive level. I encourage you to illustrate this maturity by ensuring that there are no grammatical or spelling errors. Demonstrate to your readers that you want to be taken seriously as a writer, and do this by eliminating these errors; a piece of writing that is littered with errors suggests an impatience to complete your work, an insincerity in the words you convey, and exemplifies an author who does not demonstrate the determination required to become successful. A true author abides by the laws that govern world of writing, whose demands are few and easy to meet: to be original, to write with passion, and to write with respect to grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

I hope that this essay inspires a taste for originality in others, and to write with a hand that will tell a story that is new.


© Copyright 2018 Alda Oshin. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Unknown

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

More Editorial and Opinion Essays

Booksie Popular Content

Other Content by Alda Oshin

Imprinted

Book / Literary Fiction

A Disappointment

Poem / Poetry

On Unoriginality

Essay / Editorial and Opinion

Popular Tags