Living in a box

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
Perhaps the revulsion to free cultures is due more to that fact that one still lives in the box.

Submitted: January 07, 2007

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Submitted: January 07, 2007

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When one has lived for long in conditons of limited freedom, as in regulated and heavily censored countries, it conditions the mind in such a way that exposure to greater freedom only produces an instinctive revulsion and dislike. The mind gets so used to living in protected environments where there are no free spirits to be encountered, that any change that appears to produce a free lifestyle seems wicked and corrupting.

This is probably the reason why a good part of the world where conservative religions hold sway dislikes much of western culture. They find it difficult to come to terms with the uninhibited show the western media puts up every night. A free and open life, which has only recently come to be seen as good for humans, remains as disliked as it probably always was.

The condition is much like those of boys in conservative societies who do not interact with girls, and find the whole idea of a free and open interaction with them inconceivable. It is difficult to say if the inhibition is natural or superimposed from outside. A similar situation arises with the first exposure to college life, where there is greater freedom in terms of more flexible rules. Yet in this case there is hardly ever a revulsion, and the mind cherishes its new  found freedom.

Perhaps the revulsion to free cultures is due more to that fact that one still lives in the box. Leaving the cage and actually living in free countries would not perhaps produce feelings of hatred though cultural barriers may prevent a free interaction in other countries. Graduates of a prestigious technology institute in India were described by their US counterparts as 'naive' and never coming out of their 'chummries'.

Moving into open environments should come as a fresh blow of wind, at least to the young and free spirits. Freedom might be new, but the desire to be free is a basic human instinct that finds expression even in a dead orthodox mind.


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