For whom?

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Commercial Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

The sufferings of children due to the mechanic life. Adults may tolerate with mechanic life but children gets affected.

For whom?

Mr. Sharma had no time to look after the boy who was hit over by him. Urging to catch the train, he showed no response to others. He ran like Husain Bolt and got up there at the last moment. Now, he took his time to breath. His shirt was completely drenched and it produced a cranky to others. Then, he searched for a seat; but could found nowhere. If he had missed that train, he would have no other go; but to wait there for 3 hours. Then, he buzzed Anitha, his consort.

Getting stuck in the road congestion, she no longer heard the ringtone. The buzz of horns, smokes from the nasty autos and the shackles made by the street trades gave her no prospect to look over at phone. Somehow, they both battled through the band of vehicles and reached 29-B, their home in Mangalyan Apartments.

Knock at the door made Nivitha, their only daughter open it. First it was her father park himself in the cushion. He was followed by her mom. After opening the doors, Nivitha again went to her room and started doing her work. They put their feet up for some time. Again they started to run like horses in this hasty world which has no time to spend for love.

Sharma put up the clothes on the laundry mechanic and went to take bath. In contrast, Anitha prepared for supper, a dosa made of flour which was kept 3 days ago in the fridge. Vegetables were chopped, dhal was kept in the cooker, and chutney was taken over from the fridge. A stranger could seem that fridge as a readymade hotel. Cooker blew its whistle and within minutes sambhar was made ready.

Everything was positioned at the table. “Nivitha darling! It’s time for supper”, whispered Anitha. No response was there. Then, her tone increased. She yelled yet no reaction was to be seen. She saw red; urged to Nivitha; but found her fainted. She got tensed called for water; she tried to make her awake.

Then, they thought of taking her to doctor.  But they didn’t know doctors near-by.While they came out, Nivitha, in a half conscious stage pointed out their neighbor’s house. But they paid no attention to that and geared up their way through elevator and ran up to guard. She asked “Is there hospitals near- by?” He replied with wonder “Don’t you know that 30-B was occupied by a doctor?” And now, they felt the sense why their daughter pointed out their neighbor house. Again, they went upstairs and made a knock at door of Dr. Tara’s house.

She took the stethoscope and examined her. Then she questioned, “What did she eat?” Anitha had no answer. Then again she asked for her age. Anitha calculated it for some seconds and then, the words flowed. And, now no questions were there from the doctor, as she understood Anitha. She went into the kitchen and prepared some glucose; gave it to her. “Is something serious?” asked Anitha. No reply from her. Again she solicited “What happened?” She said in low voice, “Nothing wrong. Just she had not eaten today. May be her lunch or evening snacks.”

“Had no food?” she enquired. Tara nodded her head and asked “Isn’t it your duty to provide food at right time? She’s just a six year old baby. She is very weak and has no better health. I also think she may have some mental distress.” “Sorry mam. I’ll counsel her”, she said. Dr. Tara replied “It is not her who needs counseling. But, I think you just need counseling.” 

“What are you saying? I’m all right. I need nothing.” she said in a terrible voice. “Are you right? Does it hold good to a mother? Don’t you notice whether she eats or not? Do you know what she does in her school?” said Tara.

“Hmmm…” she made no answer.  “I understand that you are going for job. But for whom, you do all these? For whom, you make your sweat count? For whom, you earn money? And, money has no worth if your child dies. She is currently suffering from loneliness, a great mental disease. You leave a child in a separate room with all comforts. Do they comfort her with love and affection? A machine cannot provide any love. Think over! Now, you are just a mechanic to her.

“What should I do?” she demanded. “I just say that children don’t have separate world. A cartoon program can make her happy. But not makes happier than your fuss.  Interaction with the world is what makes persons, competent. But just not marks. It does just make them clever. Be practical; interact with; talk with the matters happens in a school. It not alone makes her happy but you are benefitted.  ” she said.

After taking some water, she continued. “Television gives her no opportunity to speak. Even you doesn’t, then whom? For her, you are just one among machines. If you don’t show affection to her in her childhood, then reciprocate will be the same. She will leave you in an old age home, when you turn old. I think you understand.”

Tears slowly came down from her eyes. She took Nivitha and made a long fuss.  Within a moment, Nivitha fussed her and whispered that they has PTA meeting the next day. Now tears started to make a better flow. Dr. Tara gave a prescription and asked the child to take rest. Anitha showed her gratitude for giving her a chance to transform herself. Then she moved slowly to her home.

She fed her and made her sleep. Also, she slept with her. Next day, Sharma woke up and made Anitha waken up. He said “Anitha! It’s getting late. We should move to office. Be quick.” She replied slowly “Sharma! It’s not ‘we’ but ‘you’. I think we can be happy with your 1 lakh. I take leave, a permanent leave. It is now the time for me to attend Parent- Teachers meeting with Nivitha.

 

A story by

Anirudh Shankar.


Submitted: October 25, 2013

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