Amended FISA Act

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
"President Bush signed a bill Sunday that expands the government's power to eavesdrop without warrants on foreign suspects, even as Democratic leaders criticized the law and vowed to change it."
This law is wrong on so many levels.

Submitted: August 08, 2007

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Submitted: August 08, 2007

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'New Law Widens Right To Listen In'

 

'President Bush signed a bill Sunday that expands the government's power to eavesdrop without warrants on foreign suspects...' Translation? Well, to be blunt, President Bush, and the National Security Agency have the right to 'collect information' about anyone they chose. No one has challenged this new law yet, but it will happen, for many reasons. This law will more likely hurt than help, and I'll tell you why.

First of all, who the government decides to spy on will be most likely based on matter of opinion. To one person, I may be the most suspicious girl in the world and to others, I'm perfectly normal. And even if I seem to be up to something...? That gives no one the right to listen in on my phone calls or read my email.

Second, this goes against everything that the US is about: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Do you think that someone- anyone would be able to live their life normally if they had the idea that someone else might be following them? It isn't exactly liberty if you have no privacy, now is it? And as for the pursuit of happiness... Well, it's probably going to stay a pursuit if you feel like you're being watched. I know that I could never be happy that way. And then, to be more specific, it violates our Natural Rights, Freedom of Speech, and The Fourteenth Ammendment. But let's not get into that detail; we would be here all day...

Anyway, about some complications... This law gives the government permission to check peoples' bank accounts. No. What bills one pays and what money they put into the bank is their business. If they suspected you of terrorism and froze your bank account, you're pretty much screwed. By the time they get it figured out and unfreeze the account, an innocent family may have lost their house, or their car. Does that sound like what the United States government should be doing?

Everyone that happens to be foreign (even some that aren't) are targetted by the ammended FISA Act. People come to the United States to live a better life, to be free, not to have their privacy invaded and their trust trampled. The US butts in on things that they have nothing to do with. In case you haven't noticed, other countries don't like that; they don't like us. And we wonder why? It's the same thing. Bush shouldn't stick his nose into other peoples' business at all. I already know that if someone were to listen to me talk for a day, they would have no idea what I said by the end.

Next, if one person seems 'suspicious', everyone around said person would be affected. Friends, family, co-workers, their friends, family, ect. This could go on forever! Bush can't 'observe' everyone.

And for those who didn't know, Bush has been listening in on people without a warrant ever since 9/11. Until last Sunday, that was illegal. Our president broke the law, so... why should he have the right to sign this one? Besides, if he wanted so badly to do this without a warrant since 2001, then why not create the bill in...? Well, 2001 of course. It's not going to be helping us six years later and is virtually pointless.

In conclusion, people aren't going to like this... or already have a strong dislike for it. This isn't likely to help us find terrorists, on the contrary, the government will be the ones terrorizing. Think about it. People tell their children all the time: "Don't eavesdrop. It's just not right." Follow their example.


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