Status Crimes are Unconstitutional

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

this articles discusses why status crimes are unconstitutional in the United States of America.

Status crimes are unconstitutional.In the case of,  Robinson vs. California, (1962, the United States Supreme Court held that status crimes are unconstitutional.A status crime is one where spectific intent and overt action by the defendant is not present.Examples of  status crimes are:  mental health, physical handicap, criminal insanity, economic status such as vagrancy, etc  do not involve specific intent, or an overy act, and thus are unconstitutional.

While a discussion of the constitutionality of the crime of vagrancy may seem moot, it is not.  A friend on mine was recently arrested for vagracy and was put in jail without a trial for a period of 6 months.Also, a review of state statutes discloses that many states still have the crime of vagrancy on the books when this is clearly unconstitutional.Criminal Insanity statues, which also are a status crime, are also unconstitutional.

Call your congressman and ask that these unconstitutional statutes be revoked.


Submitted: April 12, 2016

© Copyright 2021 Anthony Zimmerman. All rights reserved.

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