The Cosmic Hole

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
This is about the origin hole of universe. it's called cosmic hole. This topic isn't related about black hole. This is totally related parallel or hidden universe. It can able to determine , what happened before the big bang. We just going to proof mathematically is really a cosmic hole here in our universe.

Submitted: November 29, 2011

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Submitted: November 29, 2011

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Astronomers say they’ve apparently found a giant hole in the universe—a practically empty zone, called a void, whose gaping size is hard to explain. While past studies had revealed other voids, this one dwarfs them all, research­ ers say, being nearly a billion light-years across. A light-year is the distance light travels in a year, some six trillion miles or nine trillion km. “We never even expected to find [a void] this size,” said Lawrence Rudnick, an astronomer at the University of Minne­ sota in Minneapolis, Minn. It’s “not nor­ mal, based on either observational stud­ ies or on computer simulations of the large-scale evolution of the universe,” added the university’s Liliya Williams. She, Rudnick and a graduate student re­ port the findings in a paper to appear in the research publication Astrophysical Journal. Cosmic voids are areas lacking both nor­ mal material, such as stars, galaxies and gas, and the mysterious “dark matter” that is also common in the universe. Voids seem to be rarer the bigger they are, as­ tronomers said. The new finding was based on data from a sky survey of the National Radio As­ tronomy Observatory’s Very Large Array telescope in Socorro, N.M. Researchers found a remarkable drop in the number of galaxies in a region of sky in the con­ stellation Eridanus, southwest of the con­ stellation Orion. “We already knew there was something different about this spot,” Rudnick said: it was dubbed the “WMAP Cold Spot,” be­ cause it stood out as unusually cold in a map of the background radiation that per­ meates the cosmos. This radiation—a rem­ nant of the Big Bang explosion thought to have given birth to the universe—was mapped using a satellite called WMAP, for Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. In a sense, to observe these background rays is to look at what could be called the surface of the Big Bang fireball, though the eons since then have distorted the view. Faint irregularities in the tempera­ ture of the radiation across the sky are be­ lieved to trace structures that existed in the universe’s infancy. The “cold spot” can now be explained by the dearth of galaxies in that area, re­ searchers said. “Although our surprising re­ sults need independent confirmation, the slightly lower temperature of the [radiat­ ion] in this region appears to be caused by a huge hole devoid of nearly all mat­ ter roughly 6-10 billion light-years from Earth,” Rudnick said. How does a void make the background radiation colder as seen from Earth? The answer, researchers said, lies in the so- called “dark energy,” a force that became dominant in the Universe only recently in astronomical time. Scientists don’t know what dark energy is, but it seems to work opposite gravity and to speed up an ongo­ ing expansion of the Universe. (Dark ener­ gy is something distinct from dark matter —another enigmatic substance that as­ tronomers recognize thanks to its effect on other objects, but which they can’t ac­ tually find.) Thanks to dark energy, radiation that passes through a large void just before reaching us has less energy than other radiation does, researchers say. Without dark energy, rays approaching a large mass, such as a cluster of galaxies, would gain energy from their gravity, which draws them in, Rudnick explained. As the rays leave the area, the gravity pulls back on them, sapping their energy. They wind up with the same energy with which they started. But since dark energy became dominant, he said, rays crossing matter-rich space don’t return to their original energy level —because dark energy counteracts gra­ vity. Thus, these photons arrive at Earth with a slightly higher energy, or tempera­ ture, than they would otherwise. This phe­ nomenon doesn’t occur when light rays cross a large void, the scientists added, so they reach us with less energy. * * * Send us a comment on this story, or send it to a friend On Home Page LATEST F­ ungus- treated violin beats St­ rad in blind test Showerheads may spray germs in your face EXCLUSIVES Report: cells “from space” have unusual makeup Dolphins and the evolution of teaching Drug may trick body into “thinking” you exercised Tit-for-tat: birds found to re­ pay wartime help Musical genes may be com­ ing to light MORE NEWS Rock-hurling zoo chimp stocked ammo in advance: study Faith found to reduce er­ rors on psychological test Doodling gets its due: tiny artworks may aid memory From oral to moral? Dirty deeds may prompt “bad taste” reaction Astronomers say they’ve apparently found a giant hole in the Universe—a practically empty void whose gaping size is hard to explain. While past studies had revealed other holes, or voids, this one dwarfs them all, researchers say, being nearly a billion light- years across. A light-year is the distance light travels in a year, some six trillion miles or nine trillion km. “We never even expected to find one this size,” said Lawrence Rudnick, an astronomer at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minn. It’s “not normal, based on either observational studies or on computer simulations of the large- scale evolution of the Universe,” added the university’s Liliya Williams. She, Rudnick and a graduate student reported the findings in a paper accepted for publication in the research publication Astrophysical Journal. Cosmic voids are areas devoid of both normal material, such as stars, galaxies and gas, and the mysterious “dark matter” that is also common in the universe. Voids seem to be rarer the bigger they are, astronomers said. The new finding was based on data from a sky survey of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s Very Large Array telescope in Socorro.


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