The Girl from 3007

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
A girl goes back in time to 2009.

Submitted: August 29, 2009

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Submitted: August 29, 2009

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The Girl From 3007
 
Freya crept into her father’s study, knowing that she was not meant to be in there. Her mother claimed it was for safety reasons, because there was a lot of dangerous stuff in there. Her father said it was because she might break something, which was actually very likely, because Freya was so clumsy, sometimes she could hardly walk straight and managed to trip over thin air.
Freya walked over to the desk where an odd looking device sat. She picked up the device, which was silver, and pressed the button on it. It was one of those great, big, threatening red buttons that you always wanted to press, even though it was pretty obvious you weren’t meant to press it.
Freya felt like she was being pushed around a corner. She shut her eyes tight. It felt like she was being pushed round a corner, even though she could feel that she was staying in the same spot.
Finally, the pushing stopped. Freya opened her eyes. She was standing in a study similar to her fathers, but with a few noticeable differences. The photos on the desk were not of her and her mother, but of an unfamiliar woman and three children, all girls. The youngest looked to be about her age. Another difference was the calendar on the desk. Her father’s calendar had been on January. This calendar was on July. Freya looked at the date on the newspaper which was sitting on the desk. The date was July 16, 2009. Hold on, thought Freya. 2009? I was in 3007!
Freya heard a noise coming from outside the study. She was about to call out “Who’s there?”, but thought better of it. It must be someone who lives in this house, so I should stay quiet, she thought. She tried to, but the idiot whose study this was had left a shoe on the ground, and Freya tripped over the shoe with an almighty crash.
“Who’s there?” called someone that seemed to be downstairs. I must be upstairs, thought Freya. “Is anyone there?” said the person from downstairs. It sounded like a girl about Freya’s age to Freya. Freya heard footsteps, and they were getting closer. Quick, where can I hide? thought Freya. There were no cupboards in the room, just a grey filing cabinet. I can hardly hide in there, thought Freya. She decided to hide behind the door.
Freya, who was peeping through the crack between the door and the architrave, saw the person walking up the hallway. It’s one of the girls from the photo! thought Freya. The youngest one.
The girl walked into the study that Freya was in. She looked around, and saw nothing. She was about to leave the room, when she saw something move out of the corner of her eye. She went to look behind the door, as it was the only hiding place in the room.
“Who are you?” asked the girl.
“I’m Freya,” replied Freya.
“Well, Freya, what are you doing here?” asked the girl.
“I’m not really sure. I was in my dad’s study, looking at a weird thing on his desk, and a pressed the button on it. I felt like something was pushing me round a corner, and then the pushing stopped. I opened my eyes, and I was here,” explained Freya.
“Where do you live?” asked the girl. “I’ll take you home.”
“I don’t think you can. You see, in my dad’s study, there was a calendar. The month on the calendar was January.”
“Maybe your dad forgot to change it?” asked the girl.
“He didn’t. It definitely was January,” said Freya. “And another thing. The year on the calendar was 3007.”
3007? How did you end up here, in 2009?” asked the girl.
“I think it was the weird thing on my dad’s desk. Anyway, what’s your name?” said Freya.
“Georgiana Sparrow,” said Georgiana. “But you can call me Georgia.”
“My dad met a Sally Sparrow once,” said Freya, mostly to herself.
“My sister’s name is Sally. Maybe he met her?” asked Georgia.
“He couldn’t have, we live in 3007!” said Freya.
“Of course, what was I thinking?” said Georgia.
“How old are you?” asked Freya.
“17. What about you?” replied Georgia.
“I’m 17 as well. Shouldn’t you be at school?” asked Freya.
“It’s the holidays! And guess what’s happening today?” asked Georgia excitedly.
“Um, you’re going to Spain for holiday or something? I dunno,” said Freya.
“No! The Half-Blood Prince is coming out in the movies!” She sounded very excited.
“That’s the…fifth Harry Potter movie, isn’t?” answered Freya.
“Sixth. And we’re going to see it for my birthday party in-” she glanced at the clock “-an hour. So you better find something to wear other than those dreadful tracksuit pants.”
“Are we going to see it at a cinema?” asked Freya.
“Yes, of course we are. Where else would we see it?” replied Georgia.
“Well, in 3007, we can just download movies directly onto our television.”
“Do you still have cinemas?” asked Georgia.
“There are a few around, but they sort of went out of business around 100 years ago.”
“Come on, we need to find you something nicer to wear.”
“What do mean, I have to find something to wear?” asked Freya.
“Well, you can’t go to a party in tracksuit pants.”
“Since when have I been going to your party?”
“Since you decided to pop up in my house! I can’t leave you here by yourself, can I? Don’t want the house to blow up!”
“Why would the house blow up?”
“Well, you’re from 3007, aren’t you? You probably don’t know how to use a toaster!” exclaimed Georgia.
“I know perfectly well how to use a toaster! You sound like my mum! She won’t let my dad near the toaster, ‘cos she’s scared he’s gonna blow it up again!”
“Why would your dad blow up a toaster?”
“’Cos he’s always blowing things up! He fixes things that need fixing, breaks thing that don’t, and occasionally he blows something up!” Georgia burst out laughing.
“What’s so funny?” asked Freya.
“Your dad sounds really funny! How did he blow up a toaster?”
“Don’t ask me. He just pointed his sonic screwdriver at it, and pressed the button, and it went ka-boom!” said Freya.
“What on earth’s a sonic screwdriver?”
“A screwdriver, that’s sonic.”
“Ha ha. Very funny,” replied Georgia sarcastically.
“No, really it – oh, never mind,” said Freya.
“How does your dad have a sonic spanner thing?” asked Georgia.
“Screwdriver.”
“Whatever,” replied Georgia.
 “He has because he’s an alien,” said Freya smugly.
“Don’t be ridiculous,” said Georgia. “You can’t be part alien. If you were, you’d be blue.”
“He is an alien. He just looks human.”
“Well, you still can’t be an alien. Aliens don’t exist,” replied Georgia.
“I’ll prove it to you. Your dad’s a doctor, right? He’s bound to have a stethoscope ‘round this place somewhere,” said Freya.
“There’ll be one in his study, ‘cept we’re not allowed in there,” said Georgia.
“Who cares? If people didn’t go into places they weren’t allowed to go in, I wouldn’t be here today. I wasn’t allowed in my dad’s study where I found the device that took me here, but I am here. My parents always went into places they weren’t allowed, and if they hadn’t, I probably would never have been born.”
“Okay, let’s go,” replied Georgia, defeated.
They crept down the hallway towards Georgia’s father’s study.
“Why are we creeping?” whispered Georgia. “There’s no one else here.”
“It’s more fun this way,” replied Freya. They stopped outside the closed door of the study. Georgia tried the handle.
“It’s locked,” she said.
“Out of the way,” said Freya. She pulled something out of her pocket, and held it against the door. There was a buzzing sound, and then a click. She opened the door and put the odd device back into her pocket.
“What was that thing?”asked Georgia incredulously.
Freya pulled it out of her pocket to show Georgia. “Sonic pen. Sixteenth birthday present.”
“What’s a sonic pen?” asked Georgia confusedly.
“A sonic device that looks like a pen. Now, that’s enough talk about my pen. Let’s find the stethoscope,” replied Freya.
“Why do we need the stethoscope?” asked Georgia.
“So I can prove to you that my dad’s an alien,” said Freya.
Georgia had almost forgotten about that conversation. “I don’t see how that’s going to prove you’re part alien.”
“Just wait,” replied Freya.
She walked over to the wooden desk and opened the drawer. “Ah! Here we go!” She pulled out Georgiana’s father’s stethoscope and handed it to Georgia. “Put that in your ears.”
Georgia put the earbuds in her ears and Freya took the other end of the stethoscope. She held the end of the stethoscope against her heart.
“Hear that?” Freya asked.
Georgia listened for a moment. “That doesn’t prove anything. I’ve got a heartbeat too.”
“Just wait,” replied Freya. She moved the end of the stethoscope to the other side of her chest.
“What are you doing that for?” asked Georgia. Freya silenced her with a glare.
“Listen.”
Georgia listened, and gasped. “You-you have two hearts!”
“Yes, I do. Doubt my dad’s an alien now?”
“No,” said Georgia. She put the stethoscope back into her father’s drawer and they left the room.
“So what’s 3007 like?”
“Well, you know how right now cats and dogs have microchips?” Georgia nodded her head. “Everyone has one of them implanted in their head. They have them so when people time-travel; they can scan the microchip and work out what time period they come from. There are specific landing points, kind of like airports. What they didn’t think of was people travelling to the past or to other planets, where they don’t have the microchip system in place.”
“You have time-travel?” asked Georgia incredulously.
“Yeah, didn’t I mention it?” asked Freya. Georgia shook her head. “Well, we do. I’m not actually even from 3007, we were just stopping there for a break.”
“When are you really from?” asked Georgia.
“Nowhere, really. My family are time-travellers.”
“Do they still have telephones? And television? And iPods?” asked Georgia eagerly.
“Yeah, we still have telephones, but we don’t use them as much as you do now. We definitely still have television, there’s like 10,000 channels. We still have iPods, but you probably wouldn’t recognise them. They’re very different to the ones now.” She pulled out an iPod from her pocket.
“That looks very similar to mine,” replied Georgia. She went to her desk and picked up her iPod and pulled it out of its case.
“That doesn’t look anything like what dad said they looked like in 2009,” said Freya. “He said they were big, and clunky, with an arched top.”
Georgia walked over to her computer and opened up Internet Explorer. She went to Google Images, and typed in ‘jukebox’. She showed Freya a picture of one.
“Did what he described sound like this?” Georgia asked.
“Yeah! It sounded exactly like that!” exclaimed Freya.
“Does your dad have a weird sense of humour?” asked Georgia, smiling.
“Yeah. Why?” asked Freya, confused.
“Was your mum there when he told you this?” Freya nodded. “Was she laughing or rolling her eyes?” Freya nodded again. “I think he was joking.”
“Oh,” said Freya. “I did think it was a strange design for 2009 when mum showed me a computer from this time. The computer was really slim and compact, and the what he said was an iPod was big and clunky.”
“What he told you was an iPod is actually a jukebox from the 1940s,” said Georgia. Freya burst out laughing.
“Can you tell me more about 3007?” asked Georgia.
“Okay,” said Freya. “Well, there are three main religions. Googlism, Applism and Microsoftism. Googlists worship the great god Google. There are some mini-gods too. Chrome, Images, Gmail, Web, Streetview and Earth.
“Applists worship the great god Stevejobs. Microsoftists worship the great god Billgates.”
Georgia burst out laughing.
“What’s so funny?” asked Freya.
“They’re not religions! They’re companies!”
“Well, in 3007, they’re religions!” retorted Freya.
The doorbell rang.
“Oh my God! My party! It’s in like, 5 minutes!” Georgia ran downstairs to the front door to greet the person at the door.
“Henrietta! Hi!” Georgia turned to Freya, who had followed Georgia down the stairs. “Freya, this is Henrietta Winter. Henrietta this is Freya-” she turned to Freya again to ask for her surname.
“Gallifreya Sigma-Tyler,” supplied Freya.
“-Freya Sigma-Tyler,” finished Georgia.
“Nice to meet you,” said Henrietta. “Where did you meet Georgia?”
“Um . . .” began Freya. She could hardly say she travelled back 1000 years in time and appeared in Georgia’s father’s study, could she?
“She’s Sally’s friend’s sister,” said Georgia. Freya gave her a grateful smile.
“Which friend?” asked Henrietta.
“Sophie,” said Freya.
“So, who else is coming today?” asked Henrietta.
“Um . . . Anna, Rose, Harriet and Alecia. I would have asked Elaine, but she’s in Europe,” said Georgia.
“My mum’s name is Rose,” said Freya.
“And Sally’s taking us,” said Georgia.
The doorbell rang again. The girls all went to see who it was. Georgia opened the door.
“Hi Alecia!” said Georgia and Henrietta together.
“Hi!” said the girl who must have been Alecia. “Who’s this?” she asked, looking at Freya.
“Oh, this is Freya, she’s Sally’s friend’s sister. She’s gonna come with us,” replied Georgia.
“Oh, that’s nice,” replied Alecia. “How long ‘til we go?”
“Well, we have to wait for Bella, Harriet, Anna and Rose to get here first,” replied Georgia.
“But, assuming that they all get here on time, what time will we leave?” asked Alecia.
“Well the movie starts at . . . five to 1, and it takes 20 minutes to get there, and we should leave 40 minutes before the movie starts to allow for traffic and long lines, and there’s only one car, so we’ll need to go in groups, so we should leave at . . . 11.30,” said Georgia.
 “What time did you tell us to be here at?” asked Henrietta accusingly.
“11.15,” replied Georgia guiltily. “But we thought Bonnie would be here to take some of us in the other car, but she’s gone out.”
“Who’s Bonnie?” asked Freya.
“My other older sister,” replied Georgia.
“Where’s she gone?” asked Alecia.
“She went off with this guy,” said Georgia.
“Ah,” said Henrietta.
“Ah?” asked Alecia. “What’s ‘ah’?”
“Ah is . . .” Henrietta was saved from answering by the doorbell ringing. The girls ran to see who it was, and Georgia opened the door.
“Hi!” said the two girls who were at the door together.
“Hi!” said Georgia. “Come in!” The two girls walked in and they all headed down the hallway.
“Who’s this?” asked the first girl.
“This is Freya, she’s coming with us to the movies. She’s Sally’s friend’s sister,” replied Georgia.
“Nice to meet you,” said the first girl. “I’m Rose, and this-” she pointed to the other girl “-is Harriet Jones.”
“Hi,” said Freya. “Georgia, are we going in the car?”
“Yes, of course we are, why?”
“Oh, I was just wondering,” Freya replied.
“Do you have cars in 3007?” asked Georgia quietly.
“No,” replied Freya, just as quietly. “Everyone teleports.”
“Like in Harry Potter, with Apparating?”
“Similar.”
“Georgiana Sparrow! You’re not ready!” exclaimed a new voice. The girls all whipped around.
“Hi Sally,” said Georgia, Henrietta and Rose.
“Who are you?” asked the girl, presumably Sally.
“I’m Freya,” said Freya. “I’m . . .”
Georgia saved Freya from making up a reason. “She’s a friend of mine from school.”
“I didn’t know you were coming,” said Sally.
“She’s always been coming,” said Georgia.
“And Georgia, you’re not dressed! It’s eleven-thirty! You can’t go to the movies in that!” exclaimed Sally.
“I’ll go in the second group. Anyway, I need to find something for Freya to wear,” replied Georgia.
“If you like,” replied Sally. “Who’s gonna come with me in the first group?”
“Alecia, Harriet and Rose can go with you,” said Georgia. “C’mon, Freya, let’s find you something to wear.”
 
THE END


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