The Tales of Tannerbummit

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Fantasy  |  House: Booksie Classic
Teenage girl is ditched by her parents and forced to live with her half-witted grandmother. While there she stumbles across another world which proves to e a haven during rought times. Fantasy, romance, teen.

Submitted: May 13, 2010

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Submitted: May 13, 2010

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Preface
She closed her eyes for a moment, trying to imagine what the scene must have looked like. She could swear that she heard the sounds of flowing water and smelled roses. She felt as if she were drifting away. Sunlight caused her to open her eyes. She felt the prickle of grass beneath her palms. She sat up and looked to her left. She was outside surrounded by trees, and rose bushes and directly in front of her there was a stream.
“Oh God,” she groaned. “Did my crazy grandmother decide to drop me too?” She swung to her right and did a double take, her mouth dropping open. There, propped up against a willow tree, a few years away stood the most beautiful boy that she had ever seen. He looked no more than 17-years-old and wore nothing but a loincloth. He had brown hair, orange eyes and a toned slender body. She gawked at him. He made his way over to her, stopping directly in front of her, looming over her.
After a moment of staring at each other he asked. “Why are you staring at me like so?” He imitated her expression.
“Well, look at you.” She said, her face turned up to look at him, blushing. “You’re standing outside in a loincloth like you’re Tarzan or someone.” ‘And you’re beautiful,’ she said in her head.
He scrunched up his face. “Tarzan.” He scoffed, squatting down, the cloth falling between his toned legs. “Well now, at least I’m not in my bottoms, that would be far worse, nor am I the one who just fell from up. You think I’m dashing, don’t you?”
She frowned; did he just read her mind?
“Are you trying to imply that I fell out of the sky?” She asked, still gawking at him, confused.
“Well, look around. What do your eyes behold?”
She looked around and observed the scenery. They were surrounded by green overgrown grass and trees, and rose bushes and sparkling blue water, but there was not a house in sight. She snapped her head in his direction and scrambled up. “Who are you? Where did you bring me?” She demanded.
“Excuse me?” He said, looking into her hazel and blues eyes. “You’re the one who stepped the edge, not thyself. I didn’t bring you here. I was standing right there by the tree and you fell and the ground stopped you. I stood to see if you were okay before I came over. But since you’re unharmed I guess I’ll be going.” He turned, revealing two frayed translucent wings.
“Wait!” She said, grabbing his arm. “Who are you? What are you?”
“Oh yes,” he said, turning back to face her. “Sorry, how incredibly rude of me. I am, the son of Tannerbummit. It has a nice ring, don’t you think?” He did a sweeping bow, his messy hair falling forward. He didn’t answer as to he was.
“Tannerbummit, Tannerbummit.” She mumbled under her breath, tapping a finger against her lip. Her eyes widened in surprise, “You’re-” and suddenly he vanished, as well as she. Annie sat up with a start and groaned. She was on the floor. How did she end up on the floor? She stood up and smacked her alarm clock off. She had to get ready to face another grueling day of school.
(H@P+3R 1
Helena pressed her ear against her parents’ bedroom door. They were talking loudly again. She was hunched low, her feet beginning to cramp, her pink nightgown pulled tight over her knees. She pressed against the door harder, straining to make out their words, as if they weren’t speaking loud enough.
“Look, George,” she made out, “there’s no way we can just get up and go like that. What about her, we aren’t just going to leave her here. Have we even”- Helena couldn’t make out the rest of her sentence.
“Oh, come on Carol,” he said in the tone that was reserved for people who were being utterly ridiculous. “What about your mother?”
“What about her?” She snapped back.
“What about putting her there?”
“Hah! You’ve got to be kidding me. She hasn’t seen her since she was what, four-years-old?”
“Five.”
“Whatever. The point is, I don’t feel comfortable leaving my mother with such a responsibility. You know she’s a little off.”
“Well look Carol,” his voice was full of impatience. “We’ve only got a few choices.” His voice suddenly grew louder. Helena sprang up like a frightened mouse and scampered down the short hallway as quickly as possible. Light flooded the hallway as soon as she rounded the corner.
“Where are you going?” Carol asked, sounding irate.
“To get a drink! Don’t bother waiting up.”
“Don’t walk away from me while I’m talking to you!” She yelled behind him. His steps didn’t stop. “George!” The backdoor slammed hard enough to rattle the glass panes. “Bastard!” She screamed, while throwing her own door shut.

Helena remained in her spot, shocked, surrounded again by darkness, her breath coming out shallow. What was that? Her parents had always appeared to have it together. They held hands, kissed in public, talked like civilized people, and always made time for each other. She thought everything was peachy cream. Where was this radical behavior coming from and why? She stood there a moment more before peeping around the corner. The light was still on, crawling from under the door. “Well, show’s over,” she muttered, though what had just happened was far from funny. She turned around and headed back to her room.


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