Without Sight

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
It's about growing and letting go. Try not to think about the characters so much but instead the thoughts and feelings and go from there...

Submitted: June 02, 2010

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Submitted: June 02, 2010

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Sitting in the middle of the forest was a cub. A black baby bear was crying out, confused and blind. He didn't know where his mother was, and didn't know what to do.

"Hello!" Chripred a bird, nearby it seemed. The perky and curious bird flew over to the cub and sat beside the crying baby. "Such noise from such a young cub," the bird said, head turning a bit to the side, "Why is that?" 

The bear could not see, or even knew what a bird, or any animal for that matter, looked like. Though with such a high pitched voice, he imagined the animal to be smaller than himself.

"My mother is gone, I'm alone..." Sniffled the cub.

"Aren't we all?" The bird had wondered why the bear could not survive alone, for all animals had instinct. A closer look on the young animal revealed something interesting: foggy eyes. The bird wasn't aware of the word "blind", for he never had anything to do with it before. He was a smart bird though, and knew what normal eyes looked like. He knew that this bear could not see.

"But," said the bird and flew up into the air, just to sit upon the bear's head, "We don't have to be alone if we don't want to be alone."

The cub and the bird weren't together, but they weren't alone. They weren't a team, but they weren't enemies.

The bird helped the bear see, but anyone else could see that the bear wasn't helping the bird at all. The bear didn't notice, for animals of any kind just want to survive.

The bird pointed out bushes where berries grew, and hives where bees produced honey, and eventually rivers where the cub learned to hear and smell fish to catch.

They walked around the forest so much, the cub barely needed the bird anymore. When the cub was hungry, he knew where to find food. When he was thirsty, he could find the river. When he was tired, he knew where the cave was. They barely spoke to each ohter, barely noticed each other. But the cub would feel lost without the bird.

The bird was a clever thing, and sensed the cub felt this way.

One morning the bird wasn't perched on the cub's head. The cub called out crying like he had the very first day. Like that day, the bird had come to the bear. But instead of chipring that no one has to be alone, the bird said, "Crying doesn't get you anywhere." 

The bear was young, but knew he would face problems later. For now though, he felt content. He felt safe.

For the next few days the bear tried to talk to the bird, to make the bird laugh. The more the two talked, the  more they both knew what was about to come.

The time came sooner than the cub had liked, and it came at random, but it was to be expected.

The bear awoke in his cave, alone.

The two barely talked, barely knew each other, but in a way, he was the bird. For he only saw what the bird saw, only knew what the bird knew, but in other ways he was the opposite of the bird. The bird was smarter than the cub, the bear knew this. That's why even though the loss of the closest thing the bear had hurt, he did not cry out. The cub didn't know why the bird had to leave, but the cub trusted him the entire time, so he felt he had to trust the bird knew something the cub had to learn.

The bear had no trouble around the forest. He knew every vine, tree, and river around him. The cub thought and thought about the lesson he was supposed to learn, but could come up with nothing.

The cub was about to give up, when something shocking happened.

The bear awakened with sight.

The cub saw the world for the first time, and like hearing for the first time, it was beautiful.

When he was born, he thought all the others saw darkness like him, felt the lonliness like he did, and felt so helpless. Now he knew that was not true, for he could see.

The cub walked out of the cave completely and walked around from memory, but was now able to memorize the scenes and not just the steps and scents.

On his new journey, he heard a familiar chirp and looked up. It was a small, red animal that he learned was a bird. Though it wasn't just any bird, it was "the bird." They looked at each other, slim to none tension in the air, the cub said,

"You have taught me things that only a mother could teach, but with her absent, you taught just as well. From the bottom of my heart, I thank you for starting my adventure."

The bird looked down upon him, not because he was better - for no one is better than anyone, wise or not - but because he was in a tree, and said,

"Cub, I saved you from doom that might have not come over you, and I tried my best to teach you. I welcome your thankings, but no thanks are necessary. Remember the lesson for journies that come to you, or journies you start."

The bear nodded his head, warmth in his eyes that was reflecting the warmth in the bird's eyes. Though they were never that close, they were the closest.

The cub had walked on.

Looking at the bird for the first time made him realize that not everyone will be as nice as the bird, and not everything will be as cruel as the darkness. Not every emotion is consistant, and anything can change at anytime. Not everyone should be trusted, and those who are trusted may break that trust. It can hurt, but feelings change too. The cub walked on because it's better to walk on, the bird made the cub learn this. The cub was blindly guided for a while, and learned that way, and survived that way, but only because he needed to. He saw life for himself, and gained enough knowledge to grow off of, so he could think for himself. Crying for help doesn't guarentee help, but hearing cries for help doesn't mean to ignore it. The cub has more to learn.

The bird is wiser than the cub. The cub is wiser than some others. Wisdom should be shared so others won't be blind too.


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