Deus

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Religion and Spirituality  |  House: Booksie Classic
This story is about the infiltration of the seven deadly sins on an unexpecting society and the havoc that reaks as a reslut.

Submitted: June 10, 2010

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Submitted: June 10, 2010

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Deus
In this world, nothing is more terrifying to your average, ordinary; living in suburbia type of man, than an empty pot of coffee and a yappy dog next door, and Mr. Williams was an expert in the kind of torture one might expect in suburban life. His neighbors possessed many means of anguish. Everything from huge RVs taking up half the street to overflowing flower beds that slowly slinked into adjacent yards.  These petty dilemmas seemed insignificant compared to what was to come.
The town of Deus was dominated by suburbia. Barely anyone lived in the city and those who did were considered intolerable. Every day, the head of the family, the man of the house, would drive his SUV to his office in the heart of the city and be home at six on the dot. Every day, she would stay at home, see to it that the kids were up and ready for school, then spend her day tiding up the house. Cleaning a little speck of dust off the mantle or polishing that one vase that wasn’t as shiny as the others. And every day the children would head off to school and achieve an exhilarating day of learning and come home ready to greet their father when he arrives. They, the children and their mother, would stand at the white picket fence at 6 sharp and wait patiently for both father and husband to arrive at their charming abode.  
The town had a single church, just off the highway, mid way between the first signs of suburban living and the glistening towers of the city. On a fine Sunday morning it was common to see families dressed in their Sunday best crowding up the sidewalk, hustling to get to church. However in the recent weeks attendance had been dropping and the resident Pastor, Father Jeffery, was becoming worried. The lack of faith in the community can be explained by one thing. Money, the flimsy green strips of paper that were pulling men away from their Creator, tiny silver coins were blinding the men of the church and no longer could they tell the difference between sin and grace, between vice and virtue, nothing  mattered to them except for being the biggest most successful house on the block. The Pastor pondered this for a moment before deciding something must be done, but what? Then, there was a gentle knock on the door and he rose from his chair to answer it.
Just to the left of the church stood a small cabin and next to it was parked a small, beat up clunker that a business man wouldn’t be caught dead in, and outside that house stood Mr. Williams. He stared at the doorway in which he stood and gloated over the fact that his house was bigger, fancier and overall more spectacular than the house of the town Pastor.  He regretted the reason he had come to this place, but such was the nature of his job. You see Mr. Williams was a land developer and as the city grows and the dollar buys more and more, the need for housing has increased to the point that the new houses must occupy Church land and Mr. Williams knew the Father Jeffery would not be happy.
As the Pastor opened the door with a solemn expression, Mr. Williams hastily removed his hat and stepped inside to deliver the news to the Pastor. Father Jeffery did not raise his voice nor did he refuse the offer. The Church was low on funding, due to the lack of attendance and this offer could bring the Church out of debt, so he accepted. When Mr. Williams left, that’s when Father Jeffery’s defenses tumbled down. He had submitted to the lure of money. He tried to tell himself it was all for the good of the Church, but he could feel his hypocrisy seething all over his body, a constant rash and reminder of his decision. The Church, though small, held much land. Land devoted to a children’s playground, a cemetery, and a park. This recent deal would cut a large chunk out of these community resources and Father Jeffery could not see the bright side in this situation.
Before heading off to bed the Pastor knelt down, raised his head to the heavens and prayed. He confided with the Lord, his remorse about his decision and the continuing lack of faith in the community, he knew something must be done and he prayed for an answer.
The next Sunday at the weekly mass, the congregation was cut in half. It was football Sunday and most families had stayed home to watch the game on their high definition, flat screen, TV’s, including Mr. Williams and his family.
Every week continued with the same trend. Fewer and fewer people showed up to worship and the church slowly slipped into a deeper and deeper debt. Father Jeffery didn’t know what to make of it. Why weren’t his prayers being answered? Did God even care about a small Church in the middle of suburbia? And the Pastor too began to lose faith. Slowly, but surely, Sloth and Indolence settled into the society.
Every Sunday morning Mr. Williams would wake up and debate with his conscious about going to the weekly service. His desire s won over his conscious and soon it faded away. A week later he awoke without the usual battle of the conscious and felt relieved. How free he felt, he had no time for Church anyway, there were much more important matters at hand, the game for instance, and every Sunday the new leather couch was his pew while he worshiped the television.
As the weeks wore on, things began to change throughout the community. Neighbors became more irritable, the desire to have the best, most expensive toys strengthened and soon every paycheck went towards financing this extravagance. Greed overwhelmed the society and no one would be satisfied until they were crowned champion.  The Martins were building a hot tub so the Johnsons built a swimming pool, and Mr. Williams, well he built the equivalent to a water park in his backyard. A pool complete with diving boards and slides. But that was only the beginning. Extravagance became the norm. If you were to walk outside in the morning to retrieve your newspaper, you were to be wearing nothing less than a designer robe and slippers, the idea of frugality had vanished, leaving behind nothing but designer labels on every piece of merchandise.  Avarice had grasped onto the town of Deus and was determined not to let go.
Quarrels broke out between neighbors who used to be great friends. The eyes of man were covered with a green haze. A monster was developing inside each of them, coursing through their veins, shouting “More! More! More!” One day while swimming in his new pool. Mr. Williams spotted a scene that turned his blood cold. There was Mr. Johnson in his backyard tending to three ponies surrounded by every little girl in the neighborhood, demanding a ride on the pretty little horses. The green haze surrounding Mr. Williams took hold, pulling him towards the ponies, and there he waited until Mr. Johnson had retreated back into his house, then Mr. Williams pounced. With the silver knife from his new kitchen set, Mr. Williams slashed the ropes holding the horses and let them run free. Now he had the best house on the block. There was no stopping it as Envy took root in the once serene village of Deus.
The people of Deus consumed more and more electronics, toys and food. The wives of the families took it upon themselves to serve the best home-cooked meal in the town. They cooked and they cooked while their families ate and ate. Nothing could stop them. Mrs. Martin had the best peach cobbler, while Mrs. Johnson claimed her brownies were to die for and Mrs. Williams declared her cheesecake to be a work of art. The women continued their kitchen brawl while Gluttony became happily seated around everyone’s dining room table.
Back at the Church, Father Jeffery witnessed the horrific scenes occurring throughout the town and he pleaded, “God! Where are you? How could you let this happen? The people-they’ve gone mad? Why oh why haven’t you answered my prayers?” Then he stumbled back to his cabin and wept. He wept for the sake of humanity, for men who were led astray and he wept for God. He apologized again and again for the sins His people were committing, but it wasn’t enough. One voice cannot solve the problems of the society.  
Nothing was a joint effort anymore. Everyone kept to themselves, even the children. When they did encounter each other the street corner transformed into a battle scene, a shouting match. Father Jeffery felt he had to intervene. With a gentle tap he knocked on Mr. Williams’ door. A few seconds later it was opened to reveal a changed man. Mr. Williams’ features had hardened leaving behind a face that looked as if it had aged 20 years since Father Jeffery had last seen it a month ago. The Father entered the house and confronted Mr. Williams. He claimed he had a way to solve his problems, soothe his obvious unhappiness and create a healthier family life. Mr. Williams might as well have spat in his face. He turned on the Pastor with a scowl bubbling with hatred and declared that he had life all figured out, he needed help from no one and everything in his life could be solved by him and only him. With a final glare from Mr. Williams, Father Jeffery hurried out the door, knowing his suspicions were true. A sense of hubris or over excessive Pride had developed within the society he held so dear.  
As he was walking home Father Jeffery saw a group of teenagers huddled together at the park. Probably driven out by the constant bickering of their parents, they sought refuge with each other. They were mingling about, a bit of harmless flirting, or so Father Jeffery thought. About a week later while out tending the Church grounds he saw the Johnson boy and Mr. Williams’ daughter going at it on the playground. This one incident followed by many others introduced the world of Lust into the terrible little town.
This is where he snapped. The Pastor called for a town meeting immediately and once the citizens had gathered before his Church he informed them of their children and the incidents in the park only to be greeted with a burst of noise from all around. Everyone was pointing fingers at each other, snarling under their breath, hurling curse words this way and that, the town had reached mass chaos. As Anger spread through each and every face, the Pastor feared the worse had come and his beloved town had met its fate. A lack of faith lead to greed, envy, gluttony, pride, lust and anger, Father Jeffery could do nothing but watch as his village tore itself to pieces.
He knelt down before the crucifix and murmured a prayer, barely decipherable through the raucous behind him and he said, “Lord, I have lost all hope. The seven deadly sins have infiltrated our borders and I cannot stop it. I fear for the fate of humanity. If one town can be reduced to shambles, why not others?” Then from high above came a deep rumbling and a light shone down into the village, directly where the Pastor knelt. He got to his feeling a new kind of strength, he marched to the podium, raised his hands in the air and the crowd grew silent. Then he preached. He preached with all his heart, explaining to his congregation the effects of the deadly sins. He preached with such reverence, such authority and the crowd listened, in awe of what they were hearing. Neighbors apologized, as did the children and the following Sunday the Pastor saw his Church as full as it had ever been, he saw the renewed faith in the eyes of his people. Mr. Williams decided to build houses somewhere else and Sundays were spent in worship rather than on the couch. And as for Father Jeffery, well his prayers were answered and the town of Deus was saved through the work of a determined preacher and the Heavenly Father.


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