Eternity ends today

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
In one province there were no residents. It was intentionally left empty and was sanctified by priests so as to challenge, on scientific grounds, the age-old principle that a holy place is never an empty place. And so there was such a place. Anyone who settled there, either in error or by their own will, was evicted; dwellings were knocked down and once the building rubble had been cleared away, grass was planted—free, as it were, to flutter in the wind.
In my country residents started to battle with ancient wisdom a long time ago. My country was a new type of state, where all were liberals, where all cleaned out their own rubbish and even scratched their own backs and feet, so as not to trouble anyone else with such a task. Justice in my country was elevated to the level of veneration, and people believed in it as Catholics do the Virgin Mary. In my country it was the simple cockroaches that gained the most, because the act of their obliteration was called ‘insect control’ rather than ‘destruction. “Let me control you,” said the destroyer to the one about to be destroyed, and at first that one fell into the trap of illusion and even felt somehow more at ease. But then, once sprayed and while watching the light of the world going out before him, he guessed that things were as they had always been: destruction was still destruction. The rest of the time the destroyer used the word control and the ones about to be destroyed calmed themselves: “So it’s not murder;” then, “perhaps it will pass,” and “maybe it is something else; perhaps this control is even a good thing.” Don’t say that people have not become cleverer over this last eternity, which is now coming to an end.

Submitted: January 30, 2008

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Submitted: January 30, 2008

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Eternity ends today
 
In one province there were no residents. It was intentionally left empty and was sanctified by priests so as to challenge, on scientific grounds, the age-old principle that a holy place is never an empty place. And so there was such a place. Anyone who settled there, either in error or by their own will, was evicted; dwellings were knocked down and once the building rubble had been cleared away, grass was planted—free, as it were, to flutter in the wind.
In my country residents started to battle with ancient wisdom a long time ago. My country was a new type of state, where all were liberals, where all cleaned out their own rubbish and even scratched their own backs and feet, so as not to trouble anyone else with such a task. Justice in my country was elevated to the level of veneration, and people believed in it as Catholics do the Virgin Mary. In my country it was the simple cockroaches that gained the most, because the act of their obliteration was called ‘insect control’ rather than ‘destruction. “Let me control you,” said the destroyer to the one about to be destroyed, and at first that one fell into the trap of illusion and even felt somehow more at ease. But then, once sprayed and while watching the light of the world going out before him, he guessed that things were as they had always been: destruction was still destruction. The rest of the time the destroyer used the word control and the ones about to be destroyed calmed themselves: “So it’s not murder;” then, “perhaps it will pass,” and “maybe it is something else; perhaps this control is even a good thing.” Don’t say that people have not become cleverer over this last eternity, which is now coming to an end.
Incidentally, I can easily prove that eternity ends today. Don’t you believe me? Good! The inquisitive mind accepts nothing on faith. And your mind is an inquisitive one, is it not? A good thing that it is inquisitive, I say. So, eternity ends today because everything that has been up until today has ended and everything that will be has also ended, only the other way around. You don’t like it? Well, that definitely means you are a resident of my country. Residents of my country have a very moderate approach and never go around playing with time. They simply don’t have time for it.
There were many occupants in the province where no one lived, but they were not seen as residents. They spent a lot of time there, setting up temporary refuges, but despite staying in this area for hundreds of years they were not seen as permanent residents. They had disposable housing, disposable thoughts, and even disposable souls, and every evening they would throw out these everyday things with the rubbish and in the morning they took new ones from the pack. As these things were in high demand, they could not be made in an expensive or complex manner. Therefore everything was made nice and cheap, but of a reasonable quality. You get up in the morning, get a new soul from the pack, tear open the packaging and pull it on nice and tight—good and clean and convenient as well. How was it they didn’t think of it before? Disposable souls are much cleaner, more economical, and definitely healthier than those old, worn-out, multi-use types. The discovery was made before the last world war, when the army bought up fifty million disposable souls. The effect was just amazing, no crush and no fuss; all nice and clean, like in an exemplary morgue.
The disposable thoughts proved to be no less a popular product and they improved the health of a large proportion of the unhealthy population, while the healthy population became so healthy that one could do little more than apply some ‘control’. They had really outstayed their welcome: sitting around in cafeterias, driving around in their Mercedes Benzes, living longer than the population of your average country. It’s good they still had a disposable memory, as otherwise things could have become really confusing.
So everyone found the disposable thoughts to their liking. At first they were sold in old-fashioned boxes called “The Press”. But with the advent of the universal technology known as television, thoughts were conveniently packaged in tens, twenty-fives and fifties and it became quick and easy to think them. The people liked it, and the country all the more. The Internet presented even more convenient packaging, in hundreds, with a ten-pack of sex thrown in for free.
The human with a disposable soul and disposable thoughts no longer needed to establish roots in his land, especially because his dwellings were forever being taken down, since the authorities had decided to keep the province uninhabited, and the resident soon agreed to a disposable house which he would never regret because of his disposable memory, which would not be able to remember any other, genuine house.
A major revelation of this progress was disposable living. There was a time when backward savages, the likes of Galileo and Bruno, were prepared to go to the stake for their life’s work. This became completely superfluous once the disposable conscience was invented. It could not feel shame for its bad behaviour from the day before and so it was always clean and fresh, and it absorbed three times more than a conscience could digest before.
The disposable Living was changed frequently. It was considered improper to show yourself with a Living that had seen service. Livings were sold in large boxes with colored labels, depicting healers, sculptors, politicians and writers. This was irrational. Livings are now sold in simple packages, like bars of soap, labelled with letters such as BA, MA, and Ph.D. You can also get a Living with numbers on it or even without a name, in cheap packaging and with the inscription, “What You Do For A Living,” with a full stop at the end of the sentence, because with each day this matter is completely reinvented.
Most of all, the residents of the uninhabited province took to disposable faith. Today you buy a green faith and tomorrow you spend the whole day green. Then you buy a red faith and spend the next day red; the day after that is blue. True, brown was banned, although it is sold everywhere just as before, only with a label saying, “This is not brown, even if you think it’s brown.” You could also get brown by buying two faiths of different colors. You may say that this is not a faith but a conviction. Not so. In my country such ideas were no longer shared once the disposable God had been devised. This kind of God proved to be very user-friendly.
First of all you could buy one just a few times in a lifetime: if you fall ill or are at a funeral, say, or you could get away without ever buying one at all. The disposable God was now sold in packs of three; He forgot everything the following day, forgave everyone, and smiled silently at everything. And when the Pope said that it was no longer humane to send people to Hell, people really calmed down and took to keeping this disposable God in the bedside table, next to the condoms. And you say that people have not progressed over the eternity that has passed? And you say that eternity doesn’t end today? Now listen on.
The greatest progress was made in the uninhabited province when a chemist from an uninhabited laboratory discovered disposable love. They started manufacturing this love in packs of five with the name “The Only Love”. It came to be used from the youngest and most tender years on up; industry started the production of disposable love for teenagers, and even for the very youngest children. Of course, the disposable marriage appeared on sale almost immediately. Many people actually got by without this unnecessary item and they even came to buying disposable love on the Internet, something far more contemporary, cleaner, and more convenient.
Disposable life was sold in the uninhabited province in the form of reincarnation, in packs of fifteen to twenty, and the residents of the uninhabited province used it regardless of their choice of disposable religion. Do you see how convenient it all is? One evening you’re a follower of Buddha, in the morning you follow Christ, and the day after that you’re the follower of some spineless sect.
When a disposable eternity was discovered, the uninhabited province was first expanded to the dimensions of my country, and then the entire earth was my country. When a disposable universe came on sale, the uninhabited province expanded to the size of the universe and even further, into other universes which are now on sale in packs of ten.
Disposable eternity ends today when we throw it out in the rubbish bin at the end of the day along with our disposable souls, memories, lives, careers and faith. Eternity begins again tomorrow, fresh and crisp right out of its cellophane wrapper.


© Copyright 2017 Bruce Kriger. All rights reserved.

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