TRADEMARK HUMAN

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
It is quite normal to see someone involved in so much monetary wealth.
When I grew up in the 70’s, this endevour was practically irrelevant and not really a necessity to society as a whole. There were TV programmes in Sweden that criticized commercial indoctrination, yes. But the explosion that has occured since then makes the 70’s seem like a walk in the park.
Since then the commercial world has become a hundred times more hectic. Feminists have given up their feminism and truthful people have become insincere.
In order to understand the statistical part of this we have to travel back in time. Then we realize that commercialism as such has had the same upward peaking as the population explosion. Commercialism as we know it started at the climax of the industrial revolution.

Submitted: July 12, 2013

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Submitted: July 12, 2013

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HUMAN – THE REGISTERED TRADEMARK by Charles E.J. Moulton Check your logos. Do it. Right now. Chances are that you are wearing a pair of Nike sneakers. Furthermore, you might be straddling a pair of Levi’s, Boss underwear, a C & A undershirt, Calvin Klein socks, an Esprit shirt, an H & M blazer, a Reebok cap or Ray-Ban sunglasses. You might be chewing Wrigley’s, eating McDonald’s food, drinking Coke, talking in your Samsung cellphone whilst searching your Sony MP3 for MTV’s newest number 1 hit. You could be looking through your Apple computer data file or logging into your Windows through your Panasonic iPod for the latest Suzuki moped. If you were carrying all of these things on your person at once, which could technically be possible, then you would be a walking commercial for 18 different brands. The scary thing is that this discription is not far fetched. It is quite normal to see someone involved in so much monetary wealth. When I grew up in the 70’s, this endevour was practically irrelevant and not really a necessity to society as a whole. There were TV programmes in Sweden that criticized commercial indoctrination, yes. But the explosion that has occured since then makes the 70’s seem like a walk in the park. Since then the commercial world has become a hundred times more hectic. Feminists have given up their feminism and truthful people have become insincere. In order to understand the statistical part of this we have to travel back in time. Then we realize that commercialism as such has had the same upward peaking as the population explosion. Commercialism as we know it started at the climax of the industrial revolution. Victoria was at the end of her reign, the Crimean War had become the first massively photographed war in history and the Habsburgs were still reigning their empire. A man from Chicago named William Wrigley Jr. founded a company that manusfactured soap and baking powder. Now, Wrigley soon started making a new trendy artefact that was founded on a gum base. Soon enough, Wrigley was overproducing his new fashionable mouth candy. The overproduction that followed was not reduced. The PR was increased. We can almost hear him talk: “Gentlemen, we have too much of this. But we won’t reduce the production. We’ll just have to sell this stuff a little better!” He gave out tasty chewing gum to soldiers, salesmen, actors and bushmen alike and consequently also all over the globe. An extraordinary campaign was started. Billboards with ads of his articles were lined up along every national highway. After the first world war ended, the trenchcoat, the cigarette and the chewing gum stayed with the population even if they just had been assisting service for the troops. Modern commercialism was born and the market economy florished. Soon, everyone did what Wrigley had done. Today, we cannot live without it. We are PR-addicts. Ask anyone to turn off his cellphone for a week. A financial advisor I know told me that he received hate mail as a result of leaving his cellular phone at home. What would happen if electricity failed on a global level? People would panic. Life would stop until the human being – the registered trademark – would have to start to think on their own again. We are slaves to our welfare. Spoiled rotten. Many of us are above our heads in debt, but the wealth we live in would make the Bolivian population blush. Although there is more information in the world today than ever before, the stupidity knows no bounds. This is no dry, academic phrase, but the info has not helped to elevate the human being. Poltical economy and political campaigning is today solely dependant on cash. It is unusual to find a visionaire among the top dogs. One hopeful aspect is that some children in some schools now are beginning to revalue the brandless wearing of clothing. It is now no longer considered necessary to wear the latest fashion. Not everywhere, anyway. Maybe the pendulum is swinging back. When you see the poverty in Africa or the extreme differences of wealth in cities like Bankok and La Paz, then one can argue that the distribution of wealth is immensely on the brink of economic extortion. We hope mankind wakes up. Before the rainforests die out, those of us thinking, recycling our trash and trying to shop outside of commercial endevour have to increase in number. Then the economic community of this tellar space we call Earth can maybe survice the next ice age. You can start by reducing your logos on your personage. How about making your own clothes? Sound too complicated? Then at least start cooking your own food, paint some pictures or compose a song. Then you might create something truly unique.


© Copyright 2018 Charles EJ Moulton. All rights reserved.

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