Dave

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Fantasy  |  House: Booksie Classic
Forget T. S. Eliot, Dave's a good name for a cat, don't you think?

Submitted: February 18, 2014

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Submitted: February 18, 2014

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Cat by Chris Green

My cat likes listening to Vivaldi. His favourite is the Double Violin Concerto in D. RV511. He sits on the arm of the settee purring, his back arched confidently, his head tilted slightly upwards, a picture of contentment. To build up our Vivaldi collection I have made several trips to the music library where they have a small Baroque section. You’re probably wondering what my cat is called. His name is Dave and he is black with a discrete patch of white under his chin. Forget T. S. Eliot! Dave is a proper name for a cat, don’t you think?

Another favourite of Dave’s is the Largo from Winter from The Four Seasons. He stretches out in front of the fire and rolls over. Dave is not keen on jazz. If I play Charlie Mingus or Miles Davis, he slinks off to the kitchen. If I put on The Velvet Underground’s ‘White Light White Heat,’ which I don’t that often, he spits and snarls. Sometimes my teenage daughter plays her CDs by metal bands with names like Accidental Goat Sodomy, and Rhino Clit. Dave claws at the window frantically trying to get out. Music clearly affects his mood.

Music can be used in any number of ways to improve life. I have been told that music as therapy can enhance communication, support change, and enable people to live more resourcefully and creatively. Music can bring back a stroke victim's sight, treat heart disease and improve verbal IQ.

Recently I watched a programme about the psychological coercion techniques used by American Special Forces, PSYOP (Psychological Operations). The programme described PSYOP’s use of music in interrogating insurgents in Iraq and ‘prisoners’ in Guantanamo Bay. They used a variety of music, from AC/DC and Metallica played at deafening volume, to Billy Ray Cyrus's Achy Breaky Heart played over and over again, to wear their captives down and extract confessions. I could not help thinking that Accidental Goat Sodomy and Rhino Clit might have added to their capability in this respect. The programme suggested that subliminal messages placed in infra-low frequency voice patterns were added over the Billy Ray Cyrus track. Well, I suppose it would be an improvement.

‘A Day in the Life’ by The Beatles would be in my all time top ten musical pieces. I do not have a dog, but I am told that between the final crashing E major piano chord and the backwards tape loop, there is an ultra high frequency sound that alarms dogs. I have tried it out on Dave but he is completely un-phased by it. He just carries on grooming himself, or sleeping, or whatever he is doing at the time. He is similarly unaffected by ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ and ‘Tubular Bells,’ stretches himself out a bit to Mozart’s ‘Clarinet Concerto,’ but registers disapproval at Angelo Badalmenti’s ‘Twin Peaks’ music. I suppose it all depends on the frequency of sound. Dave seems to be most in tune with the sound of the fridge door opening (in D minor, I think). I have tried opening the fridge door with and without Vivaldi playing but this doesn’t seem to make a difference.

 

© Chris Green 2014


© Copyright 2019 Chris Green. All rights reserved.

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