Our Technology Fetish is Aggravating But Unavoidable

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
Ever find that people completely taken over by their phone or iPod? In this aricle I ask what the new modern age is doing to social interaction.

Submitted: July 15, 2012

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Submitted: July 15, 2012

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Our Technology Fetish is Aggravating But Unavoidable
Status update: omnipresent phones kinda annoying tbh :/

Not so long ago I was on a train with two of my ‘android’ friends.  They weren’t robots of course – or were they?  Because their phones were seemingly engineered onto their palms; part man, part machine; minds incarcerated in the small gleaming screens.  There was almost no conversation for the whole 25 minute journey – save from when they stopped button bashing to discuss the endless possibilities of the Blackberry centre button.
But it’s not just them.  The whole world has become techno-crazy.  Since the start of contract phones the antagonising clinks and rumbles of Blackberries has become ubiquitous.  So much so, you’re actually a bit of a maverick not to own one.
I deemed it a waste of time to bringing my phone to school; but not doing so is apparently completely perverse.  The mobile phone is now as essential and commonplace as textbooks and lunch money.  Unsurprisingly, texting is now a key communication tool used by schools to contact parents.
I probably sound a tinge cynical and very, very old fashioned.  And yes, I’m a little intimidated by the price and difficulty of the latest gear.  But the truth is, I do think the potential for today’s phones and computers to maximise our social, working and daily lives is incredible.  Moreover, I’m certainly not convinced computers make us stupid or mar our creativity because they are fundamental learning tools.  However, I was shocked (and a little scared) when a speaker on the news recently admitted that in the near future it will be possible to completely live in the virtual world.  I don’t know about you, but the virtual world seems like a very undesirable place to buy a house and settle down. 
The return journey now and as I expected my phone fixated friends are indulging themselves once more.  Do I completely elude them?  Do they believe in life beyond the screen?  Or do they permanently reside in the virtual world?  Would it be rude to interpose; would it be rude to express my dismay at being ostracised by the two inanimate objects?  In fact, maybe I have a moral obligation to help liberate my companions from their silicon superiors.
Use your phone whenever, wherever and for whatever you want: exploit your unlimited minutes and seize its many frivolous facets – which I believe are called ‘apps’.  But I beseech you, please remember standard politeness in the company of others – I can only assume my friends send me endless texts when they’re with their families and ignore them instead!  Don’t be ashamed of your technologically callow friends; overcome the fear and paranoia of “that awkward moment” and give real conversation a second chance.
Almost time to alight after a long journey of staring out the window.  My contemporaries have been giggling the whole time so I ask what’s so funny.  Turns out they have been texting each other despite being two feet away!I sigh, give up and return to the window.
I have no choice, I must adapt to modern times if I’m to sustain life.  I’ve decided, for Christmas, I must update my phone.  But when I become a silicon slave, remember me for the values I fought in vain to uphold.


© Copyright 2017 Chris Park . All rights reserved.

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