Canadian National Interview

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
My interview with the Canadian National Newspaper re: a new realease.

Submitted: December 23, 2009

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Submitted: December 23, 2009

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ONCE UPON A GODDESS
BY
CHRIS STEVENSON
 
 
The idea for this urban fantasy came to me in a flash while I was watching late night television. Strangely enough, it wasn’t a movie, but one of those commercials touting all the fun you might have visiting one of the newest Indian gaming casinos. In the audio background of the clip, Frank Sinatra was singing one of his old standards, Luck be a Lady Tonight. Now, wait a minute, I thought. What if luck really was a flesh and blood lady, but was also a very powerful divinity? And just as surely as Jo Rowling saw Harry Potter with the lightning scar on his forehead while taking a cross-country train ride, I swore I saw a character I called Felicity Fortune, hove into view fully formed. A little investigation found me in the stacks at the library investigating Fortuna, the Roman Goddess of luck. Toss in her nasty daughter, Beshaba, who is the maiden of misfortune and chaos, and add to it a suicidal mortal, whom they can fight over and try to split like a wishbone…and eureka! I had the story.
 
On to the plot…
 
Mason Hart has just lost his job, fiancé, and car in less than 48-hours. A short time later, he accosts a cop and ends up in jail. He finally lands in a hospital as the result of a jailhouse brawl. Did I mention that he has also been struck by lightning? He is helpless to quell this downhill slide into calamity. Since he believes all is lost at this point, suicide seems the only alternative left…
Until the figure of Felicity Fortune, the Roman Goddess of Luck interrupts Mason’s suicidal plans just in the nick of time. It seems Felicity was hampered by the bird flu and few other appointments, so she must apologize for her tardy appearance. She tells Mason that he’s ripe for a cosmic alignment, and that his 15-minutes of fame and wealth are finally at hand. He is allotted six chances via the roll of the golden dice for his deserved share of the “Great Cornucopia.”
But as a result of Felicity’s tardiness, the cosmic alignment is about to unravel. Beshaba, the Maid of Misfortune, has earmarked Mason at the exact same time to heap upon him the bad luck part of the equation. She is the evil incarnate daughter of Felicity, and now covets Mason for her own devious alignment. And everything that Beshaba represents is in stark contrast to the Goddess of luck. It is a deliberate ploy to spite the good works of the mother, thus laying down a challenge of cosmic power. Beshaba’s minions chase Mason Hart across the country to ruin and foul every fortune he accumulates. 
Their simultaneous claim to Mason forces the two Goddesses into a mythological catfight in hell. When the push and shove reaches a fevered pitch, even the destiny of humankind is called into question.
Mason must discover the ultimate selfless act that will turn the tide in favor of the Goddess he loves. More importantly, he must find the solution and tear away the veil of darkness that could upset the divine balance between good and evil. However, what Mason does not know is that the final key is himself. And no one ever told him about the consequences of falling in love with a real Roman Goddess.
The narrative includes exotic locations and events: treasure hunting in the Florida Keys, searching for gold in Valdez, Alaska, a hideout in the Ozarks, and a trip to Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky. The story contains humorous asides, romance, and adventure, as well as the never-ending chase. The theme is predominantly Man against Himself, as it appears in similar stories, like Bedazzled, Manikin, Date with an Angel, Splash, Xanadu, and others. 
Why do I think this is a tale that would appeal to both men and women? What red-blooded male wouldn’t love to be in the company of a real Goddess and have his shot at fame, friends and eight by tens? Not to mention, the chance of a truly celestial romance. What woman would not enjoy the ultimate empowerment over everything she surveys? Not to mention, possess enough beauty and charm to cause heart murmurs and stop traffic.
 
Chris Stevenson is a native Californian presently residing in Hemet—the dig site known as “Valley of the Mastodons.” His career has spanned such occupations as automotive mechanic and service manager, government security officer, and newspaper reporter and editor. At the age of 26, he discovered Twilight Zone Magazine and got the urge to write short stories. Shortly after, he entered the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest and placed amongst the finalists. After a whirlwind of mediocre successes, including his book, Dinothon, which was nearly optioned for film, he put pen and paper aside. He’s just recently taken up splashing ink again, to continue the writing career he’d always dreamed of. Word Wars and Once Upon a Goddess are his first novels from Rain Publishing. Planet Janitor—Custodian of the Stars, will be appearing in the fall of this year, published by Blu Phi’er Books.
Once Upon a Goddess is a large quality trade paperback that can be obtained from
Rain Publishing Inc.
2025 Guelph Line, Suite 264
Burlington, Ontario, CanadaL7P 4X4
Ph. (905) 592-2122
Google Rain Books for their special website.
 
Amazon.com, or your local bookseller.


© Copyright 2020 Chris Stevenson. All rights reserved.

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