Isle Lake

Reads: 449  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
A journey of realisation.

Submitted: January 23, 2011

A A A | A A A

Submitted: January 23, 2011

A A A

A A A


 
I had to get away. I felt as if I was trapped in some kind of inescapable nightmare which was work. Ever since the crime in New Hampden had risen to a never ending high, I had seemed to be living in my office at the police department. The flickering white light that shone from the bulb above me delivered a sharp strike of pain to my eyes. The bitter after taste of the brown liquid they call coffee lingered on my breath, but all of this now seemed very familiar. Countless pages lay before me, displaying a trophy of the past month. As I was unwillingly about to get started on the days paperwork, a subtle knock on the door broke the airy silence. Katie the receptionist appeared, she then told me in her monotonic voice that Chief wanted me in his office, she then slammed the door. This didn’t help my uncanny headache which had been the culprit for my lack of sleep. Not knowing what Chief wanted, I stood up and abruptly sort out his office.
 
In wonderment, I stood outside the door that read “Chief Haddon”, what could he want? Maybe my papers had been inaccurate, or he could be in dissent with me sleeping and spending every waking hour in my office. But as it turned out, he was worried. Chief Haddon was concerned about my wellbeing, about how my whole life was overwhelmed by work. He told me to pack my bags, he told me to go to Isle Lake. Isle Lake was far away, a remote town overlooking a frigid, indistinct lake. I was uneasy with the thought of staying there, but maybe Chief was right. It could be good getting my mind off work. Not knowing if I could face the bright light that shone outside, I picked up my glasses and slid them on, they made the world seem bearable. I then packed the belongings I kept in my office and began the long trip to Isle Lake.
 
I was staying in Chief Haddon’s old holiday home he used to go to when he was young, but first I had to pick up the keys from the diner at the entrance to the town. On my arrival I could see the diner in the distance; it seemed strange to have a diner in such a secluded area in which it was. I pulled over onto the side of the road and entered the gloomy eatery. Within the second I opened the door an obscure, elderly man asked me “are you William Tredd?” I replied “that’s me”. He than handed me the keys and whispered “good luck”. I then said “thanks” and departed the diner. Something bothered me about that man, but I decided to ignore it and carry on to the house. I parked the car where a sign read ‘Haddon House’. It must have been a five minute walk through a tree abundant area from where I parked the car to get to the house. It was getting dark when I first saw the house. In the moonlight the house was dismal, an old wooden lodge with stairs leading down to the lake bellow. I walked along the creaky wooden deck to the seemingly worn out door. With a bit of effort I turned the keys and walked through the doorway to my home for the next week. The interior of the house was the twin of its exterior; the furniture must have been dated back three generations. The power was out but I was too tired to care. I found the bed and fought to get to sleep.
 
I woke up with unforgiving light in my eyes; I looked to my glasses for revenue. Although my headache drained my head, I was grateful for the sleep I got. As I got out of bed I looked out of the stained window too see the lake, which was surrounded by a rocky shore. I thought to myself about making the most of my time off, so I promised myself that after I get the power on I would go for a walk down the lake. To get the power on I had to find the fuse box which luckily I noticed on my entry. I trudged down the stairs into the lounge where up on the wall was a secluded fuse box. With a flick of a few switches the house lit up like a flashlight which although I didn’t admire made me feel safe, I then fulfilled my promise.
 
My walk was long and industrious. The scenery was breathtaking, but something caught my eye more than anything else. Through the light filtering gaze of my glasses I was looking into the entry of a cave. The day was humid and bright, which made the darkness come with a warm welcome. As I walked through the voluptuous entry of the cave I fell into a slumber, it seemed as if I was watching myself walk deeper and deeper into the cave that at first seemed seductive but now was far from it as darkness started taking over. My eyes were getting heavier and heavier, my legs weaker by the second. Fright shocked my body as I realised I was falling.
 
I woke up unsure of what had caused me to have fallen into the trance that brought me into this cave, a home of shadow befriended by darkness. I touched around me, feeling the hard rock wall that I lay beside. I could barely stand, but I managed. I patted my pockets, searching for my phone, a source of light. Fortunately it hadn’t been damaged in my fall. The phone provided just enough light for me to see where I was going. The cave was bizarre, it was near perfectly straight. My conscience was directing me left, I was willing to follow. It seemed like hours in which I was walking until I felt something, a breeze. Without thought my walk turned into a steady run, I needed to get out. I followed the breeze’s gentle touch until in the distance saw something beautiful, light.
 
The thought of getting out of this daunting hole turned my run into a sprint, and as soon as I knew it, light was showering over me. The shower of light was accompanied by a shower of thought. Ever since I began my job as a detective, I was ever shadowed my death and sadness. My profession kidnapped me from the beautiful shine of life and happiness. I needed to run away from this shadow, I needed to quit my job, I needed to walk into the light.
 
By Connor Columbus


© Copyright 2020 Connor Columbus. All rights reserved.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

Add Your Comments:

More Other Short Stories