Tyrone's "I and the We"

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
Tyrone is an eight-year-old basketball player with great shooting, dribbling, offence and defense skills. Tyrone was influenced his whole life to be a great basketball player like his father before him.

Submitted: April 28, 2011

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Submitted: April 28, 2011

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By
Benji Crow
Cosmiccrow@Cox.net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Submitted to Psychology
Psychosocial Analysis Paper
 
Teacher: M. Woods
 
April 4, 2005
 
College of the Redwoods
 
 
 
Tyrone’s “I and the We”
 
Tyrone is an eight-year-old basketball player with great shooting, dribbling, offence and defense skills. Tyrone was influenced his whole life to be a great basketball player like his father before him. When he was little his dad would play catch with him, and encourage Tyrone to hone his basketball skills. His mother would say things like, “focus on your shot, and try harder next time”. By the time he was six his skill well surpass those of the average eight-year-old. And he knew it. Tyrone’s first practice turned out to be a disappointing one. When his mother asks he explains, “Coach J told me I am not a team player. He said I need to learn to pass the ball off to my other teammates and not always try and shoot it myself. But I told him I knew I could shoot better than all the other kids. I don’t understand why I have to help the other kids learn to shoot too.” Now I gave a brief description of Tyrone, we will uncover the psychosocial analysis, to look at how he could orientate to the team, how this affects his future socially, and the struggle between the I and the We.
Tyrone grew up either practicing by himself or with his influencing father. There weren’t many kids in the neighborhood for him to practice with. This may have influenced his teamwork, it’s hard to learn teamwork playing alone, and when dad plays he’s more of a couch. So one thing Tyrone can learn from his teammates is teamwork. Every good basketball player knows the more skills one ads to there list of skills the better the basketball player. Besides your team can be your best friends, but if you never pass to them that can hurt peer friendship, and that can be bad for team moral.
If for some reason Tyrone does not learn to be a team player it can affect his social, competition, and career relationships. Middle school is the stage in life when one is forming the habits that will continue with them throughout life. If Tyrone doesn’t conform he may retaliate against such groups, organization and couches. This could lead to struggles in keeping a job, listening to instructions, and cooperating with other employees. It is important for Tyrone to learn teamwork.
Tyrone conflict between the I and the We, between self and communion. Tyrone should conform and learn communion, because up to this point he has lived a self-centered life. This is a great opportunity for him to teach some of his own skills to his teammates. If we could look at every team, we would see that ever team has one excellent player that help teaches the other players throw cognitive learning. If Tyrone could do that he would realize that he is the team leader, and team leader must know how to utilize their teams talents. If I was the couch I would simple say to Tyrone that for every assist he make he can make two shots. This would let Tyrone make his own diction to be a team player, and strengthen the team as a whole from the ground up. Players learning from the couches and players learning from players is what a team should be.
Now if Tyrone were my kid I would encourage him to listen to the couch. I would also point out all the great basketball players, and how their teamwork wins the game and not the individual player that wins the game. I would also show Tyrone how teamwork goes beyond the court, and out into real life.
 


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