ACT: Decider or Decliner?

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
ACT

Submitted: May 27, 2014

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Submitted: May 27, 2014

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ACT:  Decider or Decliner

 

Honestly, what does a timed test prove? To me, the ACT proves nothing.  Who is going to care if you are able to read charts and graphs unless you are going into marketing?  The science and reading section on the ACT do not prove anything.

 

Charts, graphs and small paragraphs of opinions, which is all the science section on the ACT is compiled of.  In my eleven years of education, I may have studied this content twice.  This is because it is mainly common sense, not based on “book knowledge.”  I believe the science section should be composed of chemistry and biology, content we have learned in class; that is also coming from a person with their highest score in science.

 

Comprehension what does it prove if you are set on a time limit?  I know many kids that could make a score twice as good as their original on the ACT if they weren’t on a timed test sure, you could argue that this practice is getting them prepared for college, however tests in high school are times as well and these students do fine on them tests.  In my opinion, it all comes down to nervousness.  They are given forty minutes to ready four passages and answer thirty-five questions.  This might be enough time for some students but definitely not the majority of them.

 

Although the ACT might not be an acceptable test of knowledge for the Science and Reading section, it is acceptable for the Math and English sections.  The Math section is a fantastic test on the ACT it is constructed of questions students can answer based on the knowledge they learned in the classroom if they followed the correct criteria.  When I say English is acceptable, I do mean acceptable.  Grammar is far too important not to be tested over due to the fact that students will use it in college to write essays, however, it boils down to how much time students spend studying grammar in the classroom.  Studies show that most middle school and high school English courses consist of approximately one-fourth, at the most, of the year studying grammar.  If students are going to be tested over these criteria on a test that can make or break their future plans then shouldn’t more time be spent on it.

 

In conclusion, the ACT does not test your knowledge that you have learned in school with the exception of Math (and partly English.)  Therefore, I think a good solution for this would be to change the test and make it exercise the knowledge we learn in school, or change the quality core to the ACT standards.


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