Office of the Inspector General Department of Justice Report on James Comey Memo

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: August 29, 2019

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Office of the Inspector General Department of Justice Report on James Comey Memo

 DECLINING TO PROSECUTE BY TRUMP STANDARDS IS AN EXONERATION!!!!!!!!!!

 Donald J. Trump?Verified account @realDonaldTrump

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James Comey leaked CLASSIFIED INFORMATION to the media. That is so illegal!

3:40 AM - 10 Jul 2017

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Report of Investigation of Former Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey's Disclosure of Sensitive Investigative Information and Handling of Certain Memoranda

Introduction This report describes the investigation by the Department of Justice (DOJ or Department) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) into the creation, storage, and handling of certain memoranda (Memos) written by former Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Director James B. Comey. Between January 6, 2017, and April 11, 2017, while Comey was Director of the FBI, he memorialized seven one-on-one interactions that he had with President-elect and President Donald J. Trump.1 Throughout this report, these Memos are referred to as Memo 1 through Memo 7, numbered chronologically according to the date each Memo was written. Comey, who had original classification authority as FBI Director, marked a small amount of information in Memo 1 as classified at the time that he wrote it. Comey also believed that Memo 3 contained classified information when he wrote it, but did not mark the document as classified. Comey kept signed originals of Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 in a personal safe in his home and, following his May 2017 removal as FBI Director, provided his personal attorneys with copies of Memos 2, 4, and 6, and a redacted version of Memo 7; Comey never took copies of Memos 1, 3, and 5 to his home, and never shared these Memos with anyone outside the FBI.

 

In June 2017, following Comey’s removal as FBI Director, the FBI reviewed the Memos to determine if any of the Memos contained classified information. The FBI determined that Memos 1 and 3 contained information classified at the “SECRET” level, and that Memos 2 and 7 contained small amounts of information classified at the “CONFIDENTIAL” level. The FBI designated Memos 4, 5, and 6 as unclassified, “For Official Use Only.”

 

This matter was referred to the OIG for review in July 2017 by then-Acting FBI Director Andrew G. McCabe, consistent with Department regulations and the Inspector General Act, after the FBI determined that Comey may have shared with his attorneys Memos that contained classified information. At the time, the OIG also was aware of Comey's June 8, 2017 congressional testimony that he had authorized a friend (who was also one of his personal attorneys) to provide the contents of Memo 4 — which did not contain any classified information — to a reporter for The New York Times. The focus of the OIG's investigation was to determine whether Comey violated Department or FBI policies, or the terms of his FBI Employment Agreement, in his handling of the Memos during and after his tenure as FBI Director. The OIG's investigation included review of the Memos as well as numerous additional documents, emails, and news articles; and forensic analysis of certain computer systems. As part of this investigation, the OIG also interviewed 17 witnesses, including former Director Comey and Daniel Richman, the individual who, at Comey's request, shared the contents of one of the Memos with a reporter for The New York Times.

 

Through our investigation, we learned that Comey considered Memos 2 through 7 to be his personal documents. He created Memo 2 and Memo 4 on his personal laptop computer, and kept signed originals of four of the Memos — Memo 2, Memo 4, Memo 6, and Memo 7 — in his personal safe at home, while he was serving as FBI Director. He also generated a duplicate set of “originals” of Memos 2 through 7 for his Chief of Staff, James Rybicki, to maintain at the FBI. When Comey was removed as FBI Director on May 9, 2017, Comey still had copies of Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 in his personal safe at home. After being removed as Director, Comey did not report to the FBI that he had copies of these Memos. Comey subsequently provided his copies of Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 to the Office of Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III on June 7, 2017.

 

On May 14, 2017, Comey used his personal scanner and private email account to provide electronic copies of Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 to one of his personal attorneys. Three days later, on May 17, that attorney provided, via a personal email account, copies of these four Memos to two other attorneys, who were also part of Comey's legal team. Of the Memos Comey shared with his attorneys, Memo 2 contained six words that the FBI determined in June 2017 to be classified at the “CONFIDENTIAL” level;3 Memos 4 and 6 contained information that the FBI determined in June 2017 to be “For Official Use Only,” but did not contain classified information; and Memo 7 was redacted by Comey before transmission, which obscured the information in Memo 7 that the FBI determined in June 2017 to be classified. Comey did not seek authorization from the FBI before providing Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 to his attorneys.

 

On May 16, 2017, Comey provided a separate copy of Memo 4 to Richman, who was one of Comey's attorneys and also a close personal friend. Richman also had served as a Special Government Employee at the FBI during a portion of the time that Comey was FBI Director. Comey sent photographs of both pages of Memo 4 to Richman via text message from Comey's personal cell phone. Comey instructed Richman to share the contents of Memo 4, but not the Memo itself, with a specific reporter for The New York Times. Comey did not seek FBI authorization before providing the contents of Memo 4, through Richman, to a reporter. As noted above, the FBI later marked Memo 4 “For Official Use Only” and determined that it did not contain classified information. We found no evidence that Comey or his attorneys released any of the classified information contained in any of the Memos to members of the media.

 

 

THE INSPECTOR GENERAL'S INVESTIGATION WAS A WITCH HUNT

MORE LIES FROM THE PRESIDENT WHICH THE RIGHT BELIEVES.

MORE SPIN BY AG BARR TO PROTECT THE PRESIDENT.

 

 

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DOJ IG "found no evidence that Comey or his attorneys released any of the classified information contained in any of the memos to members of the media." I don’t need a public apology from those who defamed me, but a quick message with a “sorry we lied about you” would be nice.

7:01 AM - 29 Aug 2019

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