Omaha Beach(German)

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Action and Adventure  |  House: Booksie Classic
A Dutch civilian is recruited at the end of world war II, he is sent to omaha beach. What he doesn't know is that the Allies will attack the next day.

Submitted: May 07, 2014

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Submitted: May 07, 2014

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[ FOOTBALL GAME ]

I was appointed at the west coast in Normandy on June 5th 1944. My name is Jan van Hogeboom and being here was not my idea of a perfect birthday. Just a couple of months ago I had been recruited, oh well, recruited? The regiment ordered every man or boy from seventeen or older to report at the local services. Secretly I hoped for an office job or to become a factory worker, but I was in no luck that time. Though, I was not all out of luck. Where some of my friends were ordered to the frontlines in Russia, I was sent to a bunker on a beach named La Plage d’Or. None of us can ever speak out the name correctly, so we just call it Gold beach. Anyway, I am happy not have been sent to inner Russia, rumour has it that winter fell and they have nothing but drinks to warm themselves.

‘Jan!’ Rudolf called at me from afar waving his hands, ‘You’re Dutch right? You can speak different languages, don’t you?’ Rudolf was the first of the Germans to accept me, next to me there were just three other Dutch in our division. The three lucky ones, I guess. ‘Yes, sort of. Where do you need me for?’ Rudolf had blond hair and light blue eyes, like a true German solder. I on the other hand crisp brown hair and dark blue eyes, neither way he was my best friend here. ‘You have to come first!’ He said with wild enthusiasm. What did that mad mind think to do today? And I laughed hearty while running his way.

When nearing reaching him I slacked my pass ‘You need a damn good reason to let me exercise this much.’ Rudolf put his right arm on my shoulder. ‘Oh, but I do. Though, first things first.’ He knew I had no patience and did like to test it over time. ‘Come on, say it.’ Rudolf  signed to another soldier that he also need to come. This was Luke, but everyone called him Mannstein.  This, because he was very muscular and because of that one night out when everyone puked of the alcohol, he only askes ‘Another?’ He ordered one and drank it whole. Mannstein had black hair and brown eyes, but his face betrayed him of being a German. I heard he was born in Cologne and that his mother was originally French, I could not dare to ask him because he said he hated the French. He was a fine lad, as long as you made sure he did not hate you.

When Mannstein reached us Rudolf finally explained himself  ‘Me and Mannstein have a bet about what the English word is for du, I think it is tu and Mannstein you. Which of the one is it.’ They always  come up with these kind of games when bored. ‘I am sorry to disappoint you Rudolf, but I have to agree with Mannstein.’ Rudolf hated losing and he spoke a little agitated ‘There goes my salary.’ He recovered himself after paying Mannstein what he owed him ‘Jan, you care for a game of football?’ The last word he tried to speak in English, but with his failed gravely in his afford. Instead of ‘football’ he spoke it like fo-ootball, his German accent made it even worse. I decided not to say anything about it ‘sure.’

 

[ BAD WEATHER ]

We had to end the match early because of bad weather. A shame, really. I liked hanging out with the lads in a casual manner. Now we sat in our bunker, hiding from the rain. Due to this, the sphere was grim. The bunker was small with to less beds for all to sit on. Luckly, not all of us slept here together because that would be disaster. Rudolf tried to relieve the tension and grabbed a set of cards ‘Anyone likes a game of chance?’ No one answered, I knew he meant well, but we were all thinking about when this easy life was going to end. ‘War is a game of chance.’ Mannstein answered, we all thought of it and he knew. We all knotted and an old man came forward. Old? Well, twenty-one is old to be alive in war. ‘When will they come here do you think?’ He was a veteran, told to have served in the Africa corps. He now was our sergeant. ‘Herr Lovenstill, don’t they first attack Calais?’ The sergeant looked at Rudolf with watchful eyes and made him shut up immediately. It was not easy to make him stop, I tried many times, but he did it with only one glimpse ‘They want us to believe that, no, they will attack here.’ He was sure of it, why? There was nothing of worth on these beaches, nothing in particular no less.  Something was wrong with this statement ‘But don’t they need harbors to supply their troops? Such a thing isn’t possible out here.’ The man laughed at me as if it was funny, ‘Yes, we have none. But if I have learned something of war then it is that war brings inventions, even some that make the impossible possible.’ He stood up and left the bunker, walking in the stormy rain to the next one. I must have made him remember something he did not like, something about war.

With our sergeant gone, the sphere was somehow restored. Mannstein stood up and walked to Rudolf ‘Give me those cards, I’ll share.’ And the game started. ‘What did you think he meant with ‘inventions’?’ Rudolf began, ‘Making the impossible possible? Vague.’ A small blond brown eyed soldier laughed ‘Probably just to frighten you.’ And the others laughed with him. 

We heard some footsteps and let Luke and Friedrich take a look. Friedrich was the quiet type, did not say much, but was a great help when you needed him. He had black hair and blue eyes, he was thin and around two meters long; therefore we called him ‘the grim reaper’.  They cheered when coming back ‘Halleluiah!’ Two lads came inside, holding a barrel. They put it in the corner ‘Do you guys want some beer?’ The barrel was opened and alcohol made itself master of us. Of course, we thanked them gracefully for their gift by holding them up in the air while praising them. While they were put on the ground they wanted the attention of the company ‘I want to bring a toast to our beloved Jan,’ one began, the other followed ‘this is his nineteenth birthday and he has the pleasure to celebrate it with us. Congratulations Jan!’ The company followed ‘Congratulations Jan!’ And Mannstein even brought me a beer. This would be the most wonderfull birthday ever. During the party we heard the wetter going insane and made fun of it, as if we were the ones made the weather act this way. Or perhaps it was a warning for the next day…

 

[ D-DAY ]

The 6th of July 1994, Omaha beach(La Plage d’Or); D-day. An alarm went off, it awoke me. I felt that I had just too much to drink last night. I wandered if it had been a stupid exercise like last time; it was just half past six! Our bunker was in chaos, so early after a long night. We all had a hangover and we knew it. I quickly dressed and armed myself, then I took my position like taught.

I could not believe what I saw, how could they have gotten here?! I stared amazed at the masses, dozens of ships sailing under British and American flags. ‘Mannstein, load the canon!’ Although I wasn’t in command, he obeyed me. The enemy ships began the bombardment. Some bullets hit the bunker, but the concrete yields vast. At last Mannstein was able to put the bullet inside the canon. I saw our corporal running through the grass to our bunker, he was surrounded by canon fire. He was nearly here, just a second…A bullet hit him. The poor man’s upper body was blown up within the canon fire, he screamed and cried but the pain would not disappear and he would die in a couple of minutes. I could not believe my eyes, was this war? Now I know why our sergeant left, he had to go all through this. But then again, where is he?

I just stood there, silently, until I heard a shot near me: the canon was lit. ‘Jan, what are you doing!’ The sergeant was here, ‘Go and bring me some assault rifles!’  I stoop up, saluted and ran off as quickly as possible. He was right about this attack all along, they would find a way and they did.  The riffles were in the far back of the bunker, but then again this was a small bunker. They were stored up in a locker, I opened it and grabbed enough so that each and every one of us would have one. By return I was ordered to get some ammo and so I did. Our sergeant was the only person in this bunker who had any experience in war.

At my second return I was ordered to observe the situation outside the bunker. I grabbed a sniper and wandered throughout the beach and the sea. The enemy was stranding and tanks were entering the mainland. ‘Report private Jan!’ The sergeant had no time to wait and wanted an answer now. ‘Uh… two tank and four infantry divisions embarking, sir!’ That moment I took notice of our corporal, he was dead, nothing more than a pile of ashes and his upper part covered in blood and mud. Disgusting, but I would not dare to go out and remove his remaining parts, it could be my death. 

 

[ DEAD END ]

Mannstein reloaded the canon once more and Rudolf was instructed to aim at the embarking divisions at the beach.  ‘Friedrich, Jan, get some more ammo!’ I wanted nothing more than be released from this sight and obeyed him. I heard the canon firing from behind and knew that those were the only things able to protect us from the tanks. We were far outnumbered, but we still got the bunkers. It was a lost battle, but we should not surrender! Rudolf cheered when the canon hit target and that gave us hope, hope on salvation and to live on.

I lasted some hours now, they came closer by the minute. I held my riffle in front of me and shot on the soldiers in front of me. They fell dead or wounded, I hated it. Though, it was me or them. Friedrich saw my pain and shot the wounded, we looked in each other’s  eyes and saw the same pain. We were not made to harm people, but we had no choice. Mannstein loaded the canon once more, but while standing he was shot. He was lying there, shaking while the wound exposed his blood to the outside world. Rudolf tried to help his friend and came at him. Sergeant Lovenstill screamed as hard as he could that Rudolf should get back, but his effort was in vain.  Rudolf too, was shot, he in the head. I witnessed that Mannstein stopped shaking and breathing, he was dead. In just a minute the war took two of my best friends, and for what? Because of people in Berlin who find themselves better than everyone else? But the ones who killed them were right out of the bunker, I will get my vengeance! Friedrich had the same idea and together we stood up and shot every living being out there until our ammo was running low. Lovenstill ordered us to hide ‘Are you mad! You could’ve got yourself killed like your friends.’ He was right.

A grenade appeared in our bunker and our sergeant went towards it. Just at the moment he wanted to throw it out it blew. Lovenstill’s head was cut in half, you could see his left eye dropping out of his head. Friedrich puked, I followed soon after him.  As I looked down the bunker I only witnessed three man alive; me, Friedrich and a soldier which head was covered in dust and blood so much that he was unrecognisable.  At the front door American soldiers came in and shot him. Me and Friedrich shot him. These would be our last moments. We looked at each other and shook hands…he was shot down just that instance.

So, this is it. This is my last moment of life. They say that when you die, you see your whole life backwards. That is not true, you only see what you remember. Would it have been better when I would just have gone to Russia? Should I just have fled to another country? Hmpf..thinking about this is futile anyway. And I felt a warmth running through my head, the bullet. Then coldness and darkness.


© Copyright 2020 Dutch R. All rights reserved.

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