Changing Places

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Poetry  |  House: Booksie Classic
During the late 1970's, the social sciences, across the world, exploded with book after book and thousands of articles published in dozens of academic journals on the topics of: Organizational Behavior/Development/Psychology/Theory etc., Justice Theory, Management Theory, etc. To name but a few.

Some of these books were made into management training films or movies showcasing the the theory under discussion. In some of these films, the academic theorist was hired to present his/her own theory along with it's various component parts. This usually meant "death at the box office".

The more popular films relied upon professional actors. Such as; John Cleese and others from "Monty Python's Flying Circus", a 1970's TV series from Great Britain. Others featured some American musical comedy actors like Howard St. John.

The theorist, who presented his own thinking in some of these films was Peter Drucker (1909-2005). From 1975 - 1980 and beyond, he must have published a new book, every 2 months, under new and provocative titles such as; "Speaking Truth To Power". These books were mainly about policy analysis, evaluation and reporting which relied heavily upon applied logic using complicated mathmatical analysis methods.

In the end, many were just older and long forgotten theories of business administration and management given new names and described with new vocabulary, the more popular of which would become known as "buzzwords" or, at times, "psycho-babble".

The logical application of analytical and evaluative mathematical methods did represent a new wrinkle which was immensely valuable to the student as well as to future real world practitioners. Of course, because politics always "trumps" (pun not intended) rationality and sanity, when they do not agree; the benefits, to the public's true interest, were and continue to be severely limited.

But hope for the future was in unlimited supply through-out the late 1970s. Especially after the 1974 resignation of U.S. President Richard M. Nixon.

This poem was written at some point during the period of 1975 - 1980, while studying, part-time and evenings, for the degree of Master Of Public Administration. All in response to the tedium encountered with all of the reading. The idea was to try and boost my enthusiasm for the text book material being learned.

The reader may think this odd. It did, however, enable me to tra"verse" (pun intended), without having to look down into, the "abyss of boredom". The edge of which presented itself, repeatedly.

Other poems were written during this time and for the same reason and purpose. This was the only way, occurring to me, for infusing some entertainment value into the academic subjects under study and to "press-on with" and/or "bear-up under" it all.

If you have read this far, hope you enjoy it. Let me know. Thank you. If not, then let me apologize, in advance.

Submitted: December 02, 2006

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Submitted: December 02, 2006

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CHANGING PLACES

 

By E. J. T. BRADLEY

 

 

Change Is A Universal Process,

If You Know What I Mean..

 

Modeling and Structural Analysis

Are Among The Tools You’ll Need.

 

Organizational Development,

Enables Us All To See.

 

 

CHORUS: .

I Believe You’re Changing,.

And That I Am Too.

 

Our Workplace Is Changing,

As All Things Must And Do.

 

 

Measurement And Evaluation

Have Made The Scene.

 

Computerized Methods Are Used

Everywhere, It Seems.

 

Advancements In Technology

Happen Each Day

 

Changing The Workplace

In Every Way.

 

 

CHORUS: (Repeat 3 times and fade-out......................

 

I Believe You’re Changing,.

And That I Am Too.

 

Our Workplace Is Changing,

As All Things Must And Do.

 

 

Copyright © Edward J. Bradley 2006


© Copyright 2018 EdwardJBradleySr. All rights reserved.

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