Coppers For Wishes

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
Based on the stuggle of two boys, and doing what ever it takes to survive

Submitted: May 11, 2012

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Submitted: May 11, 2012

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Coppers for wishes By ES Tevens There were two boys, very similar, besides the physical differences. One of them was quite large, the other small. Both were born under the same unfortunate circumstances, poor and homeless, no family, no one to care for them or to fell wanted. They just had each other to keep warm under a cold concrete bridge at night. They worked as if they were men in their middle ages, just for a copper a day. Such was expected of anyone who was half starved during that time. Saving their seven coppers, on Sunday at the end of a long hard week of working, starving and freezing at night, they finally purchased a piece of stale bread each. The bread they purchased was of course left over from the week before at the cheapest bakery they could find. This is what they looked forward to every week, this is how they survived. Monday's were the worst, after getting there small bellies full the night before, it started all over again, scavenging for crumbs of food where they could find it, and getting kicked like unwanted dogs if caught eating off the ground by wealthy shoes. How they dreaded the week long starvation, and weakness that followed. They would start their day by walking six miles to the factory they worked at. When they arrived, it seemed as though the cold was just leaving their little bones from the night before. They entered the factory with melancholy deep in the frown lines of their pale little faces. The only thing that changed upon leaving was their faces were no longer pale, they were as black as the soot found in a fire place, and a bit hungrier of course. Finally after seven days past, it was Sunday again, finally. Upon entering the bakery, the two boys were in awe. They glanced at each other, and again at the sign that stated new prices. The prices had gone from seven coppers for a piece of bread to fourteen. The boy’s morale had hit rock bottom, as if they weren’t already there. So they did what anyone would have done in their situation, they put their coppers together to purchase one piece of bread. Normally eating only one stale loaf of bread would still leave them half starved. Now only eating half of the normal portion, they boys knew something would have to change, and soon. On the way back from the first day of work for the week, the large boy suggested that every day they received their daily copper, they should toss it in the local wishing well and make a wish. His theory was that every day for seven days, they each make a wish, in turn for their daily wage. With nothing else to come up with and being desperate for a change, the small boy agreed. So on their way to the bridge they called home, the boys tossed their coppers into the well, made a wish, and spent another very long and cold night under the bridge. The two boys recited this as if it were a ritual; the boys just knew something good was going to happen.

At the end of a very tough, but exciting week they both went to the bakery, hoping something fortunate would finally find them when they needed it the most. They waited and waited, and just waited. Every minute seemed like a life time, and every hour that past seemed to damper the small boys’ mood, but oddly the large boy seemed hopeful. Finally the sun went down an hour before the bakery closed when the small boy had decided that nothing was going to happen. All his hopes went down the drain. Knowing nothing else to do, they returned to their bridge. The small boy began to cry. Giving up, he curled up in a little ball and went to sleep, under the ragged cloth he considered to be a blanket. The other decided to take a walk.

The next day the large boy woke for work. He looked over to find his companion without breath. He didn’t make it through the cold night without that piece of bread he had always relied on. The Large boy said good bye to his old friend and left for work. Looking back on the past week, on how he had tricked his friend into tossing his copper in the well for wishes that would never come true, he felt bad. He reflected on the night before when they had returned from the bakery empty handed, and how he had left his dying friend curled up under the bridge as he went back to collect the fourteen pieces of copper in the wishing well to buy a full piece of bread. The large boy took a detour on his way to work in hopes of finding something important. Luckily he found another bridge with a starving homeless boy under it. He approached this new boy and asked if he wanted work at a nearby factory that paid a copper a day. The new boy accepted his offer and thought to himself, “He’ll do just fine.”.........


© Copyright 2020 ES Tevens. All rights reserved.

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