MAKE Revelation/Booksie Study PART 7

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Romance  |  House: Booksie Classic
MAKE REVELATION, the booksie research and study 2009,

released this year 2010 of February.



part 7

Submitted: February 07, 2010

A A A | A A A

Submitted: February 07, 2010

A A A

A A A


NOTE:
These are just scientific and psychological explanations why there are these kind of what we call “immature teens” existing in this world, this part can be skipped and can directly go to PART-8A.
 
THE PARTS- 8 ARE THE FINAL ACTS OF THIS ENTIRE
M.A.K.E. REVELATION
 
THANKS.
 
 
 
FILE no. 9/part 7
 
Needless to point out knowing this is rampant in today’s society, however for the sake of the study, FILE no. 9/PART-7 gives substantial facts found in psychology and anatomy books concerning teenagers’ curiosity on sexual intimacy, acts, lusts and feelings, etc .
 
SUBSTANTIAL FACT no. 1:
According to Erik Erikson,
Identity VS Role Confusion (Adolescent years; 13 to 19 years old)
 
Main question to one’st self: “Who am I and where am I going?”
 
The adolescent is newly concerned with how they appear to others. Superego identity is the accrued confidence that the outer sameness and continuity prepared in the future are matched by the sameness and continuity of one's meaning for oneself, as evidenced in the promise of a career. The ability to settle on a school or occupational identity is pleasant. In later stages of Adolescence, the child develops a sense of sexual identity.
 
As they make the transition from childhood to adulthood, adolescents ponder the roles they will play in the adult world. Initially, they are apt to experience some role confusion- mixed ideas and feelings about the specific ways in which they will fit into society- and may experiment with a variety of behaviors and activities (e.g. tinkering with cars, baby-sitting for neighbors, affiliating with certain political or religious groups). Eventually, Erikson proposed, most adolescents achieve a sense of identity regarding “who” they are and where their lives are headed.
 
 
SUBSTANTIAL FACT no. 2:
 
Hormones have the following effects on the body:
 
* Stimulation or inhibition of growth
* Mood swings
* Induction or suppression of apoptosis (programmed cell death)
* Activation or inhibition of the immune system
* Regulation of metabolism
* Preparation of the body for fighting, sex, fleeing, mating, and other activity
* Preparation of the body for a new phase of life, such as puberty, parenting, and menopause
* Control of the reproductive cycle
* Hunger cravings
 
The Endocrine System of the human body comprises a lot of hormones, but the hormones affecting the teenagers or to state it better, these hormones possess the secondary sexual characteristics which are essential for puberty. These are called the sexual hormones; the androgens, estrogens, and progesterone.
 
Androgens:
 
Testosterone
 
Testosterone’s pubertal effects begin to occur when androgen has been higher than normal adult female levels for months or years. In males, these are usual late pubertal effects, and occur in women after prolonged periods of heightened levels of free testosterone in the blood.
 
* Enlargement of sebaceous glands. This might cause acne.
* Phallic enlargement or clitoromegaly
* Increased libido and frequency of erection or clitoral engorgement
* Pubic hair extends to thighs and up toward umbilicus
* Facial hair (sideburns, beard, moustache)
* Loss of scalp hair (Androgenetic alopecia)
* Chest hair, periareolar hair, perianal hair
* Leg hair
* Axillary hair
* Subcutaneous fat in face decreases
* Increased muscle strength and mass[8]
* Deepening of voice
* Increase in height
* Growth of the Adam's apple
* Growth of spermatogenic tissue in testes, male fertility
* Growth of jaw, brow, chin, nose, and remodeling of facial bone contours
* Shoulders become broader and rib cage expands
* Completion of bone maturation and termination of growth. This occurs indirectly via estradiol metabolites and hence more gradually in men than women.
 
Adult testosterone effects are more clearly demonstrable in males than in females, but are likely important to both sexes. Some of these effects may decline as testosterone levels decrease in the later decades of adult life.
 
* Libido and clitoral engorgement/penile erection frequency
* Regulates acute HPA response under dominance challenge
* Mental and physical energy
* Maintenance of muscle trophism
* Recent studies have shown conflicting results concerning the importance of testosterone in maintaining cardiovascular health.Nevertheless, maintaining normal testosterone levels in elderly men has been shown to improve many parameters which are thought to reduce cardiovascular disease, risk such as increased lean body mass, decreased visceral fat mass, decreased total cholesterol, and glycemic control.
* Under dominance challenge, may play a role in the regulation of the fight-or-flight response.
 
Estrogen
 
Estradiol
-in female reproduction, estradiol acts as a growth hormone for tissue of the reproductive organs, supporting the lining of the vagina, the cervical glands, the endometrium, and the lining of the fallopian tubes. It enhances growth of the myometrium. Estradiol appears necessary to maintain oocytes in the ovary. During the menstrual cycle, estradiol that is produced by the growing follicle triggers, via a positive feedback system, the hypothalamic-pituitary events that lead to the luteinizing hormone surge, inducing ovulation. In the luteal phase estradiol, in conjunction with progesterone, prepares the endometrium for implantation. During pregnancy, estradiol increases due to placental production. In baboons, blocking of estrogen production leads to pregnancy loss, suggesting that estradiol has a role in the maintenance of pregnancy. Research is investigating the role of estrogens in the process of initiation of labor.
 
-the development of secondary sex characteristics in women is driven by estrogens, to be specific, estradiol. These changes are initiated at the time of puberty, most enhanced during the reproductive years, and become less pronounced with declining estradiol support after the menopause. Thus, estradiol enhances breast development, and is responsible for changes in the body shape, affecting bones, joints, fat deposition. Fat structure and skin composition are modified by estradiol.
 
-the effect of estradiol (and estrogens) upon male reproduction is complex. Estradiol is produced in the Sertoli cells of the testes. There is evidence that estradiol is to prevent apoptosis of male germ cells.
 
-in male reproduction, several studies have noted that sperm counts have been declining in many parts of the world and it has been postulated that this may be related to estrogen exposure in the environment. Suppression of estradiol production in a subpopulation of subfertile men may improve the semen analysis.
 
 
 
 
 
SUBSTANTIAL FACT no. 3:
 
Adolescent Psychology
 
Adolescent psychology is associated with notable changes in mood sometimes known as mood swings. Cognitive, emotional and attitudinal changes which are characteristic of adolescence, often take place during this period, and this can be a cause of conflict on one hand and positive personality development on the other.
 
Because the adolescents are experiencing various strong cognitive and physical changes, for the first time in their lives they may start to view their friends, their peer group, as more important and influential than their parents/guardians. Because of peer pressure, they may sometimes indulge in activities not deemed socially acceptable, although this may be more of a social phenomenon than a psychological one. This overlap is addressed within the study of psychosociology.
 
The home is an important aspect of adolescent psychology: home environment and family have a substantial impact on the developing minds of teenagers, and these developments may reach a climax during adolescence. For example, abusive parents may lead a child to "poke fun" at other classmates when he/she is seven years old or so, but during adolescence it may become progressively worse. If the concepts and theory behind right or wrong were not established early on in a child's life, the lack of this knowledge may impair a teenager's ability to make beneficial decisions as well as allowing his/her impulses to control his/her decisions.
 
In the search for a unique social identity for themselves, adolescents are frequently confused about what is 'right' and what is 'wrong.' G. Stanley Hall denoted this period as one of "Storm and Stress" and, according to him, conflict at this developmental stage is normal and not unusual. Margaret Mead, on the other hand, attributed the behavior of adolescents to their culture and upbringing. However, Piaget, attributed this stage in development with greatly increased cognitive abilities; at this stage of life the individual's thoughts start taking more of an abstract form and the egocentric thoughts decrease, hence the individual is able to think and reason in a wider perspective.
 
Positive psychology is sometimes brought up when addressing adolescent psychology as well. This approach towards adolescents refers to providing them with motivation to become socially acceptable and notable individuals, since many adolescents find themselves bored, indecisive and/or unmotivated.
 
Adolescents may be subject to peer pressure within their adolescent time span, consisting of the need to have sex, consume alcoholic beverages, use drugs, defy their parental figures, or commit any activity in which the person who is subjected to may not deem appropriate, among other things. Peer pressure is a common experience between adolescents and may result briefly or on a larger scale. If it results on a larger scale, the adolescent needs medical advice or treatment.
 
It should also be noted that adolescence is the stage of a psychological breakthrough in a person's life when the cognitive development is rapid and the thoughts, ideas and concepts developed at this period of life greatly influence one's future life, playing a major role in character and personality formation.
 
Struggles with adolescent identity and depression usually set in when an adolescent experiences a loss. The most important loss in their lives is the changing relationship between the adolescent and their parents. Adolescents may also experience strife in their relationships with friends. This may be due to the activities their friends take part in, such as smoking, which causes adolescents to feel as though participating in such activities themselves is likely essential to maintaining these friendships. Teen depression can be extremely intense at times because of physical and hormonal changes but emotional instability is part of adolescence. Their changing mind, body and relationships often present themselves as stressful and that change, they assume, is something to be feared.
 
Views of family relationships during adolescence are changing. The old view of family relationships during adolescence put an emphasis on conflict and disengagement and thought storm and stress was normal and even inevitable. However, the new view puts emphasis on transformation or relationships and maintenance of connectedness.
 
 
SUBSTANTIAL FACT no. 4
 
Adolescent Sexuality
 
Adolescent sexuality refers to sexual feelings, behavior and development in adolescents and is a stage of human sexuality. Sexuality and sexual desire usually begins to intensify along with the onset of puberty. The expression of sexual desire among adolescents (or anyone, for that matter), might be influenced by family values and the culture and religion they have grown up in (or as a backlash to such), social engineering, social control, taboos, and other kinds of social mores.
Teenage couples at a fair in the American West.
 
In contemporary society, adolescents also face some risks as their sexuality begins to transform. Whilst some of these such as emotional distress (fear of abuse or exploitation) and sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV/AIDS) may not necessarily be inherent to adolescence, others such as pregnancy (through failure or non-use of contraceptives) are seen as social problems in most western societies. In terms of sexual identity, all sexual orientations found in adults are also represented among adolescents.
 
According to anthropologist Margaret Mead and psychologist Albert Bandura, the turmoil found in adolescence in Western society has a cultural rather than a physical cause; they reported that societies where young women engaged in free sexual activity had no such adolescent turmoil.
 
 
In a 2008 study conducted by YouGov for Channel 4, 20% of 14?17-year-olds surveyed revealed that they had their first sexual experience at 13 or under.
 
Teen Pregnancy
 
Adolescent girls become fertile following the menarche (first menstrual period), which occurs in the United States at an average age of 12.5., although it can vary widely between different girls. After menarche, sexual intercourse (especially without contraception) can lead to pregnancy. The pregnant teenager may then miscarry, have an abortion, or carry the child to full term.
 
SUBSTANTIAL FACT no. 5
A focus and Explanation of Erikson’s theory regarding adolescent years as well as the immaturity of teenagers:
 
Most empirical research into Erikson has stemmed around his views on adolescence and attempts to establish identity. His theoretical approach was studied and supported, particularly regarding adolescence, by James E. Marcia.
 
Marcia's work has distinguished different forms of identity, and there is some empirical evidence that those people who form the most coherent self-concept in adolescence are those who are most able to make intimate attachments in early adulthood. This supports Eriksonian theory, in that it suggests that those best equipped to resolve the crisis of early adulthood are those who have most successfully resolved the crisis of adolescence.
 
Erikson’s Identity VS Role Confusion (Adolescent years; 13 to 19 years old)
 
Main question to one’st self: “Who am I and where am I going?”
 
The adolescent is newly concerned with how they appear to others. Superego identity is the accrued confidence that the outer sameness and continuity prepared in the future are matched by the sameness and continuity of one's meaning for oneself, as evidenced in the promise of a career. The ability to settle on a school or occupational identity is pleasant. In later stages of Adolescence, the child develops a sense of sexual identity.
 
As they make the transition from childhood to adulthood, adolescents ponder the roles they will play in the adult world. Initially, they are apt to experience some role confusion- mixed ideas and feelings about the specific ways in which they will fit into society- and may experiment with a variety of behaviors and activities (e.g. tinkering with cars, baby-sitting for neighbors, affiliating with certain political or religious groups). Eventually, Erikson proposed, most adolescents achieve a sense of identity regarding “who” they are and where their lives are headed.
 
 
James Marcia’s study that supported Erikson’s Identity VS Role Confusion development
 
James E. Marcia is a Canadian developmental psychologist, and Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada.
 
Marcia studied psychological development with specific attention focused on adolescent psychosocial development. Erikson had suggested that the normative conflict occurring in adolescence is the opposition between identity and confusion (identity crisis). Marcia elaborated on Erikson’s proposal by suggesting this stage consists neither of identity resolution nor identity confusion as Erikson claimed, but the extent to which one both has explored and committed to an identity in a variety of life domains including politics, occupation, religion, intimate relationships, friendships, and gender roles. His Theory of identity achievement states that there are two distinct parts that form adolescent identity: a time of choosing or crisis and a commitment. He defined a crisis as a time of upheaval where old values or choices are being reexamined. The outcome of a decision making process leads to a commitment to a certain value or role.
 
Marcia developed the Identity Status Interview, a method of semi-structured interview for identity research, and subsequently proposed four stages, or Identity Statuses, of psychological identity development:
 
Identity Diffusion - is the status of individuals who have not yet experienced a crisis or made any commitments. Not only are they undecided about occupational and ideological choices, they are also likely to show little interest in such matters.
 
Identity Foreclosure - is the status of individuals who have made a commitment but not experienced a crisis. This occurs most often when parents hand down commitments to their adolescents, usually in an authoritarian way, before adolescents have had a chance to explore different approaches, ideologies, and vocations on their own.
 
Identity Moratorium - is the status of individuals who are in the midst of a crisis but whose commitments are either absent or are only vaguely defined.
 
Identity Achievement - is the status of individuals who have undergone a crisis and made a commitment.
 

CONTINUE TO PART 8-A


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