Going Home

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Flash Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
My entry for BUnique's 'Ghost' flash fiction contest! Hope you like it! :D

Submitted: July 10, 2013

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Submitted: July 10, 2013

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~Going Home~

 

The halls of Northern High School were eerily quiet when Cassie passed through the red double doors Monday morning. All that could be heard were the sounds of her boots clanking against the tile floor. Instantly, she felt like all the attention would be drawn to her noisy walk, but no one turned a head in her direction.

Lingering all over the place were students; her classmates looking sad and depressed. A few of them had tear-stained cheeks and red eyes. Others were huddled by lockers, still crying.

Cassie wondered what had happened as she made her way to her locker. Whatever it was, it couldn’t have been good.

Two girls were leaning against the locker beside hers. Cassie recognized them as Megan and Claudia; cheerleaders. Megan was shaking her head, holding tightly to her books, and Claudia was dabbing at her eyes with a tissue.

“I mean, I didn’t even know her that well,” Claudia was saying. “But this is so sad. I can’t believe she’s dead.”

Cassie perked up. Someone was dead?

The bell rang, and the girls left. Cassie hurried away to homeroom, slipping inside just in time for the bell. Normally she sat next to her best friend, Chloe, but Chloe’s desk was empty today.

Strange, Cassie thought. Chloe never missed class. If she was out, she must have been really sick.

She watched her teacher step up to the desk, a sad, wiped out look on her face, just like the rest of the class.

“Morning, everyone,” she said. “As many of you already know, I have some sad news for you all. We lost one of our students in a car accident last night. Cassie Peters.”

Cassie’s heart stopped for a moment, and her jaw dropped. She looked around and caught a few of her classmates sobbing.

“Mrs. Jones,” she said, standing up, shaking so much her knees almost faltered. “Is this a joke? I’m not dead!”

No one in the room, not even her teacher acknowledged her. It was like they couldn’t see her.

She touched her face. Warm skin. She felt real. She felt alive. What was going on?

“Hello!” she shouted.

“Grief counselors will be on campus for anyone who needs to talk with them,” Mrs. Jones continued.

No, no, no!

This was all wrong!

Her breathing came in quick pants, and her heart pounded against her chest, so hard she could feel the pounding in her ears.

She wasn’t dead. She had a heartbeat!

Cassie snatched her book bag up and ran out of class. She had to get out of here.

She burst through the double doors the way she’d come in and ran the whole way home. If she was dead, her parents wouldn’t have gone to work this morning. They would have been home, mourning. But no. They were long gone by the time she’d gotten up.

Well, she’d thought so anyway.

Slowing to a walk, Cassie began to struggle remembering that morning at all. She remembered going into school, but before that, everything seemed blank.

“What’s wrong with me?” she asked herself.

She came up to her house, and oddly, found several more cars in her driveway than usual, including her parents’. So not only were her parents home on a Monday, they had visitors.

She groaned as she started toward the house, already with a bad feeling coursing through her. She crept into the living room, and heard her mother’s hysterical sobbing.

“I can’t do this,” her mother was saying as she was consoled by her visitors. She was surrounded by her two sisters, a couple of friends, and even Chloe, all in tears.

No one said anything when Cassie walked in.

“Mom,” Cassie said. “I’m right here!”

No one looked her way, they just kept sobbing. It was then that Cassie realized the truth. She was dead. In an instant, her memory came back in flashes.

She had left last night for Chloe’s. They were going to study together. She remembered slowing down at the intersection, even though the light was green, just like she always did.

A heavy horn blew. Cassie had just barely turned her head to the left in time to see the grill of an 18-wheeler a foot away.

She gasped, looking around her living room.

“First mom, and now my baby!” her mother was sobbing. “I don’t know what I’m going to do!”

“Cassie?”

Cassie heard that familiar voice and it warmed her body. She turned around, and she saw her grandmother standing in the doorway. She was smiling, and Cassie could swear she had this glow about her.

“Grandma?” Cassie asked. She’d lost her grandmother two years ago, but for some reason the sight of her there didn’t frighten her.

“It’s time to go, honey,” she said.

“Where are we going?” Cassie asked.

“We’re going home.”

Cassie knew this was it. Her grandmother had come for her, to take her where she belonged now.

She followed her grandmother onto the front porch, where she saw her little sister. Cayley hadn’t been sitting there before, but now, the 6-year-old was sitting on the porch swing, staring out into the yard.

“Wait,” Cassie said to her grandmother. She walked over to her little sister, and stroked her cheek, praying she would feel it.

Cayley gasped, and she grabbed the spot, then she smiled. “Cassie, I know that’s you!”

Cassie smiled, then she kissed her little sister’s cheek.

“Grandma says Heaven is really nice,” Cayley said. “You’ll like it there.”

“Cayley can you see me?” Cassie asked.

Cayley nodded. “Yes. I miss you, Cassie.” She jumped out of the swing and gave her sister a hug. “Grandma says I have to be brave for mommy and daddy, but I can cry if I want.”

Cassie chuckled through her tears at her sweet sister. “Yeah, you can.”

“I love you, Cassie.”

“I love you, too, Cayley.”

She finally let her little sister go, and took her grandmother’s hand. She waved goodbye to her little sister as she finally let go, and she and her grandmother went home.

 


© Copyright 2020 FrootLoop246. All rights reserved.

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