Did MeToo change anything?

Reads: 143  | Likes: 2  | Shelves: 1  | Comments: 2

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: July 17, 2019

A A A | A A A

Submitted: July 17, 2019

A A A

A A A


 

It has been a couple of years since the MeToo movement began, and now it seems to have calmed down. I suppose you could say we live in the post-MeToo era, because while the movement has calmed down a lot, it affects the society now and most likely in the future.

We still hear about sexual harassment on a daily basis. If not daily, then at least weekly. This week the major headline about the topic has been the Epstein case, which is an old one, but coming up again. That’s good. 13 months is not much for something like what he has done, let alone if you get to go to work almost every day. I was expecting more from the US, because that sounds like the conviction you get in Finland, not there.

That brings me to the point of what hasn’t changed, at least in Finland. Yes, the movement started in the US, but it spread globally and yes, it reached even a forested country on the northern border of Europe. Issues came out here as well, in many areas of life from families and schools to almost each workplace. Still, the legislation hasn’t changed here much and sentences are close to nothing. For example, for rape a person must be jailed for 1 to 6 years. The law doesn’t state whether that must be spent in prison or on probation, and more often than not, it’s going to be the latter. If you rape someone under 18 years of age, the maximum sentence is ten years, the minimum two. Not only are these ridiculously low sentences, if you’re young, have a clean record and behave well, you can get out of raping an underage person with two years of probation.

Now, these are the hardest sentences. If you’re not actually raping anyone, but let’s say you are a teacher and touch your students inappropriately. You will most likely get off with a fine. You can’t be sentenced to more than 4 years. If you just randomly touch someone you have no authority over, the max sentence is six months. Months! Ridiculous.

The movement probably made it clear that sexual harassment happens everywhere. That’s of course sad, but it’s good that humans realize that and therefore can do something about it. Or at least try. At least it’s talked about in homes and schools, which is extremely important, because let’s say you’re a child. Nine years old, for example. You will obviously know what sex is, but that doesn’t mean you know what counts as harassment and that hey, if an adult wants to have sex with you, then that’s not cool. It’s good that these things are addressed and talked about, because if there is sexual harassment in homes for example, a child might not know that it’s not normal until they hear it from someone else.

I started a new job a month ago, just for the summer. I will be spending the next month cleaning a car retail store, and when I was in the two-day job training, I was almost happily surprised that the woman who taught me actually covered this topic. We went over all the safety precautions, because there are a lot of things that can go wrong in a place where you fix cars and blah blah blah, and she said it’s not in the papers, but since you’re a young woman and most of the people in this building are older males, you report it to our boss immediately if someone does anything. I hadn’t even thought about that, but I believe that it’s an important thing to say to young employees. Many teenagers work during the summer and it’s their first experience working and earning their own money. Employers should bring that up in job and safety training, because it does happen. Many teenagers don’t know all their rights as they do their first jobs, but they should, and if their bosses take up this issue, that’s great.

I don’t think the MeToo movement has brought a change in society yet, because we still deal with this problem everywhere, all the time. But it’s a step. Acknowledging the issue, addressing it and bringing out the extent of it is the first step. The second step is actually doing something and then we go on from there. So no, the movement itself hasn’t brought change but it has started a path to something more positive.

 

 


© Copyright 2020 helmu. All rights reserved.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

More Editorial and Opinion Essays