Single sex education

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: March 05, 2019

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Submitted: March 05, 2019

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Nowadays most schools and classes are gender mixed, as there are males and females. That can be seen as advancement, but are there any good sides to education being divided between sexes? What are the downsides?

My personal example of this is PE classes. Ever since third grade, we had most of our PE classes with just girls, and the guys were separated. We didn't think much about it and no one really had any issues it. Funnily though, when we grew up a little, people actually questioned the separation. In high school, we still had the classes separate, in theory, but we would be on the same field and play football against eah other. All the elective PE courses were for both sexes. If a girl wanted to go to the guys' PE class and go swimming with them instead of going skiing, the teachers had no problem with it. I don't really see how the classes can't be mixed, but I guess there are a lot of personal feelings to it. Especially teenagers might feel uncomfortable being in the same gym as the other gender and that's understandable.

Single-sex schools or classes might decrease class sizes, which might be good for some students. The atmostphere will be less chaotic and teaches can concentrate on the individuals better, helping out the kids who need help with something. Small groups will also give a good stage for different learning methods. Instead of a teacher explaining and students listening, debating and discussing are methods that can be more easily arranged with smaller groups. Overall, girls and boys can prefer different teaching and learning metods, but that doesn't apply to each individual, obviously. 

Especially when kids are in their early teens, they develop at different paces. Generally, girls hit puberty before boys, and at that time, the frotal lobe of the brain develops fast. The frontal lobe has a large effect on learning and memory, and the development of the lobe is a long process that continues into young adulthood. Therefore, classes that take into account the gender and development of the individual, might be beneficial to young students.

The situaton would cause a problem for the people who don't want to identify themselves as either male o female. A lot of people don't and since it's not necessary in this context, they shouldn't be forced to do it. In the long run forcing people, especially young people, to identify as something they might feel isn't right for them, can lead to poor self-esteem and even weaken their mental health.

Separating the genders at school might cause problems in the future. In the workplace, people aren't usually separated by gender, and for a young adult transferring into worklife from school, can be a culture shock. Same goes for further education. If a kid goes to a single-sex school their whole life and then goes to a coed university for example, consentrating on studying might be hard. Separating people in school might actually affect the personal life as well. People might find it hard to deal with the opposite sex, especiall if the kid doesn't have siblings of the other sex or any other places to meet people besides school. They might find dating hard and find their own sexuality and relationships confusing.

In the worst case scenario, single-sex schools, if becoming more common, could create inequality. One group of people could get a better education and even better jobs. We know that in many countries, women are paid less than men for the same jobs. Men also have more leadership roles in the workplace than women, and more men are in charge of things even politically. If schooling became divided, it could worsen the situation in other fields as well, and the whole community would take a step back in gender equality.

 

 


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