Now and Forever

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
Rosalie Isabel Mays is dying. So is the boy next door, Cedric Reese. There doesn't seem to be anything to do to help. Fate is fate, like it or not. Somethings last forever, some do not. We just have to try our best. Live life to the fullest, now and forever. Smile.

Submitted: February 06, 2010

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Submitted: February 06, 2010

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Now and Forever
The sun and clouds eclipsed perfectly, giving the impression of a regular, average day - the complete opposite of what it was for me. Sitting, my stuffing filled teddy bear legs dangling off the beige white windowsill, I knew something was wrong.
Or, rather, I had known something was wrong a short while ago. I could tell by the way my owner, Sabrina Isabel Elizabeth Mays, held herself for the past month; porcelain and fragile like a delicate glass that could be shattered at any given moment.
She was, to say at the least, a stubborn girl. I've been with Sabrina since she was two, so I'd know. For one thing: her name. Sabrina Isabel Elizabeth Mays was a mouthful- even to a smart seven-year old like her. And she detested it.
Her parents, as usual, had kindly given her a variety of options: Brie, Eliza, Beth, Lissa- but nothing that she had liked. She had stuck her chin in the air (something that had been done by her on a regular basis) and said quite clearly "No."
She then pointedly suggested that she would be called Rosalie, like one of the main characters of a book her babysitter liked and was constantly reading whenever she came over. Apparently the character was Rosalie Hale from Twilight and she, too, had cascading blond curls and a mesmerizing beauty.
I already said Rosalie was stubborn, but even that was an understatement. Rosalie was definitely an extreme force of nature even then, in the sultry sixes, feisty fives, fighting fours, threatening threes and terrible twos.
Poor Mr. and Mrs. Mays had to deal with Rosalie day and night through all her fits and tantrums. Well, not to state the obvious, but Rosalie won out. Like a true expert politician, she played her cards right. She started boycotting, refusing to go to school, throwing tantrums randomly and not eating. She even resisted going to sleep, staying up way past her bedtime. All of that for a name, which she then shortened to Rose.
Mr. Mays is a lawyer, for God's sake, and even he gave in to Rose. Strong, belligerent Rosalie. None of us expected to be residing in a hospital, awaiting news of Rose's survival.
That's right. Rosalie Sabrina Isabel Elizabeth Mays was dying.
She was being quarantined in a hospital, one of the best hospitals in New York. It was where I was now, watching Rose.
Her golden locks were damp with sweat, and her ice blue eyes looked dull. Her cheekbones caved in, and her bones were starting to show. Some kind of deadly virus, not contagious, luckily, was trapped inside her body and destroying her immune system.
She wasn't the Rose I knew.
Rose was stubborn and unbreakable, a fire always blazing in her eyes. She was determined and always knew what she wanted. She had a bright future in front of her, she used to.
Rose lay limp and broken, and for once actually looked like a seven-year old. Her air of confidence was long gone, and so was her strength. She couldn't even sit upright in her bed. She wasn't self-assured. She didn't know if she'd live or die. Seeing as Rose was a know-it-all, her knowing something was a first. It was so her to pull through everything. To fall down and then get back up as if nothing happened. So, why couldn't Rose get through this?
I wanted to jump off my ledge and assure her everything was fine. But that's the problem about being a teddy bear. You can't move from your own will. And unless someone burns you, you're immortal.
We're like guardian angels or something, but all we can do is watch. We can't make miracles. We can't jump in front of our owner to save them from being run over or take the blame for their fault. Been there, done that. Believe me, I know. I, Taryn the Teddy Bear have been doing this for ages.I sighed mentally, seeing as I couldn't move my fluffy brown snout, and that's when I jolted to attention. The doctor had walked in.
Rose's face froze. She was scared, terror etched on her face, which had already been pale, now was a deathly white.
The doctor, clad in the ordinary white uniform every other staff member bore, coughed. "May I speak to Mr. and Mrs. Mays?"
Rose's parents, who were solemnly watching, sat up from the visitor chair hesitantly. They nodded, their faces weary as they followed the doc out the door.
I strained my fluffy brown ears, but all I could catch were fragments.
"Relax...it might just be...we don't know...but maybe...emotional stress...more...abnormal...we will try...if...maybe...surgery…could…she…live…depends…successful."
"What?" demanded Rose, bolting upright in her bed, then lying back down as an avalanche of pain consumed her.
"Nothing," said Mr. Mays, his eyes not making contact with Rose's.
"I don't call matters that require leaving a hospital room 'nothing'," Rose muttered firmly, frail as her voice was. Sighing heavily, Mrs. Mays gave in, like always. "The doctors have decided that maybe the best way to get the virus out of your system is the old fashioned way."
As smart as Rose was, she was still seven. Mrs. May's description was a tad too cryptic for her.
"And?"
"And maybe the old fashioned way is-" Mr. Mays shot Mrs. Mays a nervous look. I could feel the anxiety building up in Rose and me. If this was a scary movie, this was the climax. Mrs. Mays cleared her throat and brushed a strand of hair behind her ear, "Maybe it's...maybe it’s surgery. And the chances of success are 5 to 10."
I could hear Rose's sharp intake of air and I knew what a big deal this was. Surgery. Graphic images filled my head. A knife cutting into Rose, digging into her flesh, blood everywhere. What if it failed? What if Rose died? Apparently I wasn't the only one thinking about this. One glance at Rose's face and I wanted to hide somewhere far, far away from here. I recoiled as Rose's parents also registered her expression.
This hospital was screwing with my furry head. All these feelings of pain and sadness definitely weren’t healthy for a teddy bear's mental well being.
"Well," We all glanced up as Rose spoke. She smiled weakly, "I'll take my chances."
Hours later Rose wasn't so sure. The doctors and surgeons had decided that they should begin the operation today, before the virus killed Rose. That wasn't the number one thing in my head, though. My interest turned to the room next door as the blinds that divided Rose's room and somebody else's that were normally closed opened.
From the corner of my eye I saw a boy. He was young, about Rose's age, which wasn't surprising since this was a children's hospital. He had to be eight or so, with sandy russet hair and a light sprinkle of freckles dotting his nose. He wasn't asleep, though his eyes were half-closed. As I looked closer I could see they were a pretty hazel with flecks of gold.
He looked pained, and was in worse condition than Rose, if that was possible. The name tag on his bedside table said in bold all-caps,CEDRIC REESE. Underneath his name, in the same font was LEAUKEMIA, the reason he was in the hospital. I knew this because Rose's said her full, official name 'SABRINA ISABEL ELIZABETH MAYS' and underneath it 'VIRUS-NOT CONTAGIOUS'.
As the blinds closed again, it finally dawned on me. That's why Rose had barely any doctors and nurses now. They've all been accumulating next door for stupid Cedric Reese. Cedric was on the brink of life and death while Rose still had a good month left of life unless some miracle occurred, like the surgery.
Rose's parents called their bosses and requested the day off so they could be with Rose and not at work. I could see this reassured Rose a bit.
She hated herself right now, being too weak to stand upright or walk. If you thought about it, though, Rose was actually pretty lucky compared to me. I couldn't move at all. I'm sure that even if I could tell Rose that anyways, she still wouldn't be one happy camper.
The door opened, not a good sign. A sideways glance at Rose proved she looked like she was about to pass out. Three surgeons stepped in, one female, and two male. They wore a ridiculous blue green shower cap over their heads, and matching gloves and uniform. The lady surgeon smiled at Rose. Her name tag said: JANE.She then turned towards Mr. and Mrs. Mays.
"I'm afraid you'll have to leave."
Silently, Rose's parents got up, kissed Rose on the forehead and left, closing the door quietly behind them. Mrs. Mays looked like she was going to cry.
"You have such a cute teddy bear, Rose. What's its name?" the surgeon, otherwise known as Jane, asked, while securing her gloves.
"Taryn."
"What a nice name. Do you want to hold her during the surgery?"
Rose nodded her head feebly and extended her arms as the surgeon got me and handed me over to her. Rose hugged me tightly, and I could feel myself being suffocated ad my air supply being cut off.
"You know, you're very lucky you have a teddy bear. The boy next door," Jane made a gesture towards the room to the left, "Cedric Reese, has never had a teddy bear in his life. His family wasn't so fortunate. He's having surgery, too," she sighed. "Anyways, are you ready Rose?"
"No," murmured Rose, "Not really."
"You won't feel a thing. I promise."
"You swear?"
"Pinky promise." Jane held her pinky out to Rose, who in turn released me to shake it.
"Pinky promise." Rose echoed.
An air of melancholy hung around the hospital. I knew why, though I wish I hadn't.A death had taken place. Cedric Reese, the less fortunate boy, had died. I mourned for him, though I never knew him. There was something about him, though, that seemed nice. It was a shame he was gone.
Rose, on the other hand, was alive. They had removed all the damage the virus had caused and was giving Rose nutrient supplements. In a week, Rose would be discharged.
Mr. and Mrs. Mays had swarmed their daughter with hugs and kisses an hour ago when they announced the surgery was successful. They had recently stepped out for a bit to talk to the Reeses and give them their blessing to Cedric. I heard the soft tap of footsteps approaching our hospital room and I realized that they were back.
"Rose. Here. A present." said Mr. Mays.
"I don't want any."
He sighed. "Just take it."
Wordlessly Rose took the box, which was nicely wrapped in gold wrapping paper with a pretty silver bow on top. She began tearing it open. A furry, fluffy object was inside. Oh, God. It was a teddy bear.
"A teddy bear," said Rose flatly, echoing my thoughts.
"Yes," answered Mrs. Mays, "We figured it'd be nice for you to have a new teddy bear. Yours is quite old... We can always return it if you don't want it," she added quickly.
"No."
"No as in what?" asked Mr. Mays.
"Don't return it. Give it to... Give it to Cedric."
"But Cedric... Cedric's..." Mr. Mays trailed off.
"I know. Wherever he is, he deserves it." Rose stuck her chin out as usual. Now that she was better, her attitude and strength were returning.
"Yes, honey. I'm sure he does." Mrs. Mays ruffled her daughter’s hair.
"Bye, Cedric," Rose whispered quietly. “I hope you like your gift.”


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