Newhaven II: Extraordinary People

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Literary Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
Time and again, I was reminded of what Margot Aldine had told me on my first day in town: "We happen to like things just the way they are!"

Submitted: October 16, 2014

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Submitted: October 16, 2014

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Preceded by:

A City of Isolation

 

NEWHAVEN

Extraordinary People

Time and again, I was reminded of what Margot Aldine had told me on my first day in town: "We happen to like things just the way they are!" I had no idea how deeply that sentiment ran until a revealing incident occurred late in my stay. The Board of Commerce hired an outside team of urban consultants to study Newhaven's economic and social problems. When the consultants submitted their final report, they appended a note saying that in the course of their research they had asked an approximate of thirty prominent locals including Mayor Spencer on where they thought the town should be in the next five, ten, and fifteen years. None of them had ever given the matter any thought.

For me, Newhaven's resistance to change was its saving grace for the most part. The town looked inward, sealed off from the noises and distractions of the world at large. It grew inward, too, and in such a way that its people flourished like hothouse plants tended by an indulgent gardener. The ordinary became extraordinary. Eccentrics thrived. Every nuance and quirk of personality achieved greater brilliance in that lush enclosure than would have been possible anywhere else in the world.

That reminds me of Peter by the way, Connor's father, just seven months after his scandalous acquittal, when the ever-so unusual Peter had one day sat down at his brilliantly carved desk to make plans for his annual Founder's Day party. I remember him calling the town's out-there party planner Cordelia Marchale and asked her to prepare a lavish yet low-country banquet for two hundred people. He hired a bartender, eight waiters, a band, and not oddly enough, a fortune teller. Then he took out his stack of neatly organized index cards and apparently embarked on the most delicate and satisfying task, which was putting together a guest list. I, for one, don't completely understand the man, but it seems like he's better off being his quirky and eccentric self than the one dealing with the death of his son.

 

Succeeded by:

Those Peculiar Ties


© Copyright 2020 J Irwin. All rights reserved.

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