War Always Changes

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Flash Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
World War IV is fought by automatons, until an old, banned weapon system takes the field once again: Man.

Submitted: August 18, 2015

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Submitted: August 18, 2015

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Decker the Wrecker from America hit Sinpai the Damned from Japan with its mighty pneumatic sledgehammer, and the small international crowd yawned.

The little automated Tonka and Toyota-built comtrucks were in the third year of their contest in the Robot Wars of 2098. The world declared only handcrafted automatons no bigger than twenty pounds could duel for world domination.

Unfortunately, the armor and gyroscope systems far outstripped what little damage such small machines could generate, so Decker the Wrecker and Sinpai the Damned were still stalemated in their surrogate war over technology embargoes.

Decker the Wrecker's sledgehammer rose on hydraulics, above Sinpai the Damned, then brought it back down over and over again on its foe's top, to no effect.

Sinpai the Damned tried to flip Decker the Wrecker again by getting under the Tonka-built and flipping its shovel, but Decker the Wrecker always landed on its wheels. With wireless power and pit stops at the end of every day, this proxy war between twenty-pound comtrucks seemed endless.

Until a young Japanese student leaped over the fence separating the crowd from the robot fight, causing a stir to pass through the audience.

"Bonzaiii!" the young man yelled as he charged through the pyrotechnics, grabbed Decker the Wrecker, turned it upside down, then sat on it.

"Victory!" the young student yelled.

The crowd went nuts.

"That's not in the rule books!" the American team protested.

The Japanese team spoke in hushed tones to themselves, then hung their heads sadly.

War was changing once again.


© Copyright 2019 Jack Motley. All rights reserved.

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