The Final Frontier

Reads: 273  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
In the voyage to understand ourselves, love is the final frontier.

Submitted: July 06, 2012

A A A | A A A

Submitted: July 06, 2012

A A A

A A A


 

The Final Frontier

Love is the most powerful word ever coined. Love has launched ships, conquered cities, raised the dead, crossed bridges made of swords, and filled the apothecary’s purse. Despite the numerous acts of Love in reality and in the bookshelf, its character still eludes us.  We struggle to grasp Love and pin it to our rational bulletin boards. Love is a permanent frontier; perpetually inhabited, but never tamed. Every pioneer has his/her idea of how to traverse the edge of the known and how to explain what he/she sees through the spyglass. What follows is my attempt to captain the Enterprise through the pure white atmosphere, crimson core, and murky dark waters of the mystery planet called Love.

The edges of love have been well charted over the first five thousand years of Western Civilization. Humans have discovered the emotional response Love brings about, as well as the passion that rises up when Love runs deep. We have learned that physical attraction and intellectual cohesion lend themselves towards a bond between two humans.  The difference between Lust and Love has been well defined. An interesting finding was the possibility that Love extends beyond human connection, binding people to ideas, places, and pets. The most important discovery humanity has made about Love (it is the only one that hints at the center of the issue) is that Love has differing levels. Love can be superficial or deep, unconditional or short-lived, strong or weak.

The varying planes of Love allow for Love to be a choice. Since we can feel differently about different people or ideals, then we can control the way we feel about each individual. We are obviously predisposed to love certain people (family) more than others (strangers), but a predisposition does not exclude choice. We are also subject to the forces of sex appeal and overall attractiveness when we are looking for a significant other, but we are still capable of denying an attractive person Love. The casual (if not flippant) attitude toward sex in society showcases the idea of choosing who a person loves and how much love is shared. Many people can copulate without ever feeling more than lust for their partner.

Building on the idea that love is a choice allows for Love to be defined as an active refusal to allow any person, place, thing, idea, or action to separate one from that which they love. The idea of Love being an active pursuit of another has been displayed in literature and history for centuries; people have merely classified the acts of characters/people like Odysseus, Romeo and Juliet, and Jesus Christ to a response to Love and not as Love itself. Love as an action (and not an emotion) is best seen in the life of Christ. Jesus did not die, or claim that the greatest of all loves was dying for another, because He believed Love was an emotion. He knew that in order to love His creations, He had to remove all obstacles from between Himself and people. He could not merely hope that His feelings would be reciprocated; He had to aggressively seek those that were to become His bride. He would not have loved humanity by expressing Himself, but He did love us by fighting for us.

Love is an active refusal to allow any person, place, thing, idea, or action to separate one from that which they love. Love is not emotion or physical attraction or the elusive “chemistry” between two people (or a person and something). Love requires action and is therefore a choice. How our actions improve (or degrade) our love for one another is yet to be discovered. Love is a frontier. It is perpetually inhabited, but never tamed.


© Copyright 2019 jcmerriman. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments: