Jim Crow Laws/Publication Precedents

Reads: 564  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
This is a research paper I'm in the process of making. MLA format; citation; it's all choppy. Forgive that.

Submitted: February 05, 2014

A A A | A A A

Submitted: February 05, 2014

A A A

A A A


Tattered, worn, literally splintering out from the seams, and not all physical forms… And which is worse? Some might debate such a controversial topic involving the 1930’s segregation. Things we do every single day of our lives such as going to the park, eating out with friends, or even playing sports had become such a massive deal. The racial publication precedents of the 1930’s dehumanized and disgraced the fundamental qualities referring to the color of skin, using countless forms of effort proving to be pitiful.

Laws were put forth left and right during the 1930s. So many things we now take for granted are crazy to think of as illegal back then. From researching one of my references to my statement, this quote was one excellent example, “'It shall be unlawful for a negro and white person to play together or in company with each other in any game of cards or dice, dominoes or checkers.' —Birmingham, Alabama, 1930" (  ). Although society today is still very poor with keeping perspective open, this quote hit it out of the park! The laws that the people came up with in the 1930s absolutely put me in awe. Many times this is how the laws were - Unreasonable and unfathomable. What person could have such a root sprouting beneath their skin to come up with such horrid things to do to innocent people? 

 

 

http://americanhistory.si.edu/brown/history/1-segregated/detail/jim-crow-laws.html (reference)

 

 

 

  “In the 1930’s, however, the organization retooled itself for the purpose of challenging the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ that formed the base of Jim Crow Laws” (Brown para 11).


© Copyright 2019 kaylamae. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

More Non-Fiction Essays