Honey Christmas

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
based off of the Hatsune Miku Voc@loid song: Honey Christmas. Watch it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzYSx-pSwEg

Just a little short story.

Submitted: August 25, 2012

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Submitted: August 25, 2012

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A A A


Honey Christmas

By: Lii-chan

Based off the Voc@loid song: Honey Christmas

 

Hannah walked along the plaza’s edge, trailing behind the general crowd. Along the side of the town gardens, vendors sold last-minute candles and warm treats. Hannah reached into her coat and fingered her own candle, just to make sure it was still there. The snow fell on the streets, and all around the misshapen snow-families that the children had been making all day sat as silent guardians, cold and vigilant. The air was filled with snow and holiday cheer as the cathedral bells rang out the hour.

Kobe waited against the wide steps of the cathedral, candle in hand. His worn-out coat was comfy and warm against the chilly wind, but his ears were still cold. His mother, in all her infinite wisdom, had forced him to submit to having his long hair tied back. He really had no choice, since she forbade him to go to the ceremony unless he looked “presentable”. He glanced over the crowd, picking out individual townspeople, before a bright red scarf caught his eye. He couldn’t help but chuckle at the little girl who lived next door to him, Hannah. The scarf was too big, and hung down at the ends of her small dress. Her leggings looked warm, but baggy. Her hat covered her pigtails, salt-and-pepper speckled with the falling snow. Her gloved hands were held close to her chest. He called her name and waved her over. The cute little kid made him feel like a big brother, playing house and hide-and-peek among the fence hedges. Even though his job at the factory was tough and he felt a lot older than 23, this little girl made all his stress fly south like the songbirds.

“Hey Hannah, are you cold?”

The girl giggled as she looked at Kobe. He was a nice guy, he played with her and sometimes he’d buy her ice cream in the summertime. She liked him. She pulled her candle out of her jacket and tightened her scarf. It was her Dad’s scarf; he let her have it today when he told her she was old enough to go to the ceremony on her own.

“Nope, but is it time to go inside yet?”

“You know, I think it is. Get on my shoulders, Han. If we hurry, we can get a seat until time for the ceremony.”

And so, carrying her, Kobe ran to the front of the cathedral and sat on the front pew, usually reserved for the clergy. He looked at Hannah, who was unwinding the scarf from her neck and folding it up. She caught him staring and gave him a gapped grin from where she was missing some baby teeth. He sighed and said:

“Hannah, listen. Do you know why we do the ceremony?”

The girl looked at him with a confused look. All of a sudden, Kobe had gotten serious, like her Dad did when he made her sit still on Sunday morning. She thought, but couldn’t think of a reason. She shook her head thoughtfully and said

“I really can’t think of a reason why we do it, but we don’t need a reason, do we?”

Kobe turned on the pew so that he sat with her at his full attention. He put his hand on the girls shoulder, and looked deep into her big blue eyes.

“Hannah, listen closely. This ceremony is important to the whole town.”

“Why?”

Kobe looked at the girl’s face, which was pulled into a childish mask of concern and confusion. He laughed at her, feeling a little guilty. He meant to teach her, not frighten her.

“Look a’here, kiddo. I’m not being a weirdo right now. I just wanted to see if your dad taught you about the ceremony.”

“No…”

“Well, this is the day known in the world as Christmas, a holiday that many countries recognize. A lot of people celebrate it. But we don’t do the whole…the whole Christmas side of it, really. When we honor our town with this ceremony, even on Christmas day, we aren’t just doing a song and dance number, Hannah. We are fulfilling a tradition to keep our town running. If we didn’t, the town may fall apart. When we do the tradition, we are literally shown the light, to understand everything.”

“I’ve never-never really paid much attention to the ceremony.”

“Pay attention this time, Han. When we light-oh, it’s starting!”

A hush fell over the crowd as the head clergyman stood at the pulpit, with one lit candle. He held his hand up at the large stained-glass masterpiece above the pulpit, full of life and flowers and doves, with a large yellow-orange circle in the middle. The clergyman said a few words, stared at the packed cathedral, smiled, and began to sing, handing his lit candle to the deacon. The congregation followed along in time with the song:

With this candle, small and bright we-

Hannah sang the hymn, this time listening to the words of life and devotion that poured out of every verse. It was beautiful to hear, warm and sweet. The clergyman’s candle had been going around the room as they sang, and now Kobe leaned down to light Hannah’s candle, and then passed it over her. Even though she was 6, you had to be 10 to be allowed to hold the candle in the ceremony. She didn’t mind, though. Her candle had caught her full attention; the light in the room was low and soft, lit by thousands of candles. Then, as the hymn ended, the full moon that had been climbing high in the sky hit the circle of light in the window. The congregation was silent, bathed in orange light. The feeling in the room was like no other Hannah had ever felt. She swayed slightly, and leaned against Kobe, overwhelmed by feeling. She thought of his earlier words, that the world celebrated this day, too, as something called Christmas. She smiled. All around the world, this night was celebrated? It must be a magical night, then. Yes, that’s it. Hannah stared at the room, full of warmth and slow, thick, orange light, like a drop of honey that fell from a spoon. Even though it wasn’t a time for wishing, even though she may never feel the ceremony as acutely as she had this night, she made a soft wish that she repeated every time across the years as she blew out her candle.

“Please… Please make it a Honey Christmas.”

Honey Christmas

By: Lii-chan

Based off the Voc@loid song: Honey Christmas

 

Hannah walked along the plaza’s edge, trailing behind the general crowd. Along the side of the town gardens, vendors sold last-minute candles and warm treats. Hannah reached into her coat and fingered her own candle, just to make sure it was still there. The snow fell on the streets, and all around the misshapen snow-families that the children had been making all day sat as silent guardians, cold and vigilant. The air was filled with snow and holiday cheer as the cathedral bells rang out the hour.

Kobe waited against the wide steps of the cathedral, candle in hand. His worn-out coat was comfy and warm against the chilly wind, but his ears were still cold. His mother, in all her infinite wisdom, had forced him to submit to having his long hair tied back. He really had no choice, since she forbade him to go to the ceremony unless he looked “presentable”. He glanced over the crowd, picking out individual townspeople, before a bright red scarf caught his eye. He couldn’t help but chuckle at the little girl who lived next door to him, Hannah. The scarf was too big, and hung down at the ends of her small dress. Her leggings looked warm, but baggy. Her hat covered her pigtails, salt-and-pepper speckled with the falling snow. Her gloved hands were held close to her chest. He called her name and waved her over. The cute little kid made him feel like a big brother, playing house and hide-and-peek among the fence hedges. Even though his job at the factory was tough and he felt a lot older than 23, this little girl made all his stress fly south like the songbirds.

“Hey Hannah, are you cold?”

The girl giggled as she looked at Kobe. He was a nice guy, he played with her and sometimes he’d buy her ice cream in the summertime. She liked him. She pulled her candle out of her jacket and tightened her scarf. It was her Dad’s scarf; he let her have it today when he told her she was old enough to go to the ceremony on her own.

“Nope, but is it time to go inside yet?”

“You know, I think it is. Get on my shoulders, Han. If we hurry, we can get a seat until time for the ceremony.”

And so, carrying her, Kobe ran to the front of the cathedral and sat on the front pew, usually reserved for the clergy. He looked at Hannah, who was unwinding the scarf from her neck and folding it up. She caught him staring and gave him a gapped grin from where she was missing some baby teeth. He sighed and said:

“Hannah, listen. Do you know why we do the ceremony?”

The girl looked at him with a confused look. All of a sudden, Kobe had gotten serious, like her Dad did when he made her sit still on Sunday morning. She thought, but couldn’t think of a reason. She shook her head thoughtfully and said

“I really can’t think of a reason why we do it, but we don’t need a reason, do we?”

Kobe turned on the pew so that he sat with her at his full attention. He put his hand on the girls shoulder, and looked deep into her big blue eyes.

“Hannah, listen closely. This ceremony is important to the whole town.”

“Why?”

Kobe looked at the girl’s face, which was pulled into a childish mask of concern and confusion. He laughed at her, feeling a little guilty. He meant to teach her, not frighten her.

“Look a’here, kiddo. I’m not being a weirdo right now. I just wanted to see if your dad taught you about the ceremony.”

“No…”

“Well, this is the day known in the world as Christmas, a holiday that many countries recognize. A lot of people celebrate it. But we don’t do the whole…the whole Christmas side of it, really. When we honor our town with this ceremony, even on Christmas day, we aren’t just doing a song and dance number, Hannah. We are fulfilling a tradition to keep our town running. If we didn’t, the town may fall apart. When we do the tradition, we are literally shown the light, to understand everything.”

“I’ve never-never really paid much attention to the ceremony.”

“Pay attention this time, Han. When we light-oh, it’s starting!”

A hush fell over the crowd as the head clergyman stood at the pulpit, with one lit candle. He held his hand up at the large stained-glass masterpiece above the pulpit, full of life and flowers and doves, with a large yellow-orange circle in the middle. The clergyman said a few words, stared at the packed cathedral, smiled, and began to sing, handing his lit candle to the deacon. The congregation followed along in time with the song:

With this candle, small and bright we-

Hannah sang the hymn, this time listening to the words of life and devotion that poured out of every verse. It was beautiful to hear, warm and sweet. The clergyman’s candle had been going around the room as they sang, and now Kobe leaned down to light Hannah’s candle, and then passed it over her. Even though she was 6, you had to be 10 to be allowed to hold the candle in the ceremony. She didn’t mind, though. Her candle had caught her full attention; the light in the room was low and soft, lit by thousands of candles. Then, as the hymn ended, the full moon that had been climbing high in the sky hit the circle of light in the window. The congregation was silent, bathed in orange light. The feeling in the room was like no other Hannah had ever felt. She swayed slightly, and leaned against Kobe, overwhelmed by feeling. She thought of his earlier words, that the world celebrated this day, too, as something called Christmas. She smiled. All around the world, this night was celebrated? It must be a magical night, then. Yes, that’s it. Hannah stared at the room, full of warmth and slow, thick, orange light, like a drop of honey that fell from a spoon. Even though it wasn’t a time for wishing, even though she may never feel the ceremony as acutely as she had this night, she made a soft wish that she repeated every time across the years as she blew out her candle.

“Please… Please make it a Honey Christmas.”

 


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