The Five Dimensional World

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Memoir  |  House: Booksie Classic
A story about my sister and how she led me to my own five dimensional world

Submitted: September 05, 2015

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Submitted: September 05, 2015

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The Five Dimensional World

Nine years ago, I made the transition from living in a four-dimensional world to a five-dimensional one. I stepped out from a dull world governed by only space and time and walked into a realm firmly ruled by space, time, and love. I was led to this new reality by a newcomer to the world: my sister.
 

The beginning was rough because when I heard I had a sister, I kicked the furnace at my friend’s house, for I had dearly hoped for a baby brother. My young mind had reached for gods I had never worshipped so that my wish could become true. When I learned that my prayers were ignored, a feeling of betrayal swept over me. I was dragged to the hospital the next day, but I was on the verge of throwing a tantrum, and stomped into the hospital. Yet when I entered, the room was warm and well oxygenated. My mother gave me a smile, and next to her was the latest member of the family. An invisible hand started to mend my heart and my frustration evaporated. I sat next to the small bed, savoring the peace, until I was told by my father to go home.

 The peace was short. My sister would often crush my toys and escape. She disassembled my Starwars Lego figures, attaching the head to the legs, and the legs to the walls. I had to crawl on the floor to find missing pieces. When I looked up, she would grin with satisfaction. I had no other choice but to grit my teeth and keep scavenging. This developed into a new game, because my sister would crawl as fast as she could the moment she saw my room was open. I grew a habit of closing my door whenever I went somewhere else. But when my sister learned to walk and open doors, I was given no other choice but to return to scavenging missing pieces. Only my sister’s mercy could save me, mercy that was granted after a year.

However, there was no end to the mayhem even after the game ended. My sister would burst in anger when she could not solve a math problem, or when her clothes fit her too tightly. She would scream, hit anything, stomp the ground, or tear up books. The tears would pour on her red cheeks, and she would shut her eyes and scream to the top of her lungs.
At first, my mother tried to punish my sister by forcing her into the bathroom. Yet minutes later, she escaped and came barging into the dining room with the same red face. My mother shouted and scolded, but my sister resisted even harder. It took a long time for my mother to become adjusted, because I had succumbed easily to her punishments. Until then, I was caught in between these battles. I would return home to see some books ripped apart, or toys scattered on the floor. These were the remnants of the brave rebellion. Now, the skirmishes are less frequent. But just as the ideology of a rebellion lasts forever, so did the bravery of my sister- or at least in me.

 A few weeks ago, I walked to the convenience store with my sister for the first time. I was worried about going out because I had difficulties maintaining a conversation, even with close friends. But my sister boldly began chattering the moment we walked out. She talked about how she had taken a pop quiz for math class for the first time, and that she received an 88. I made a joke that her score was not that impressive. She immediately degraded me by pointed out that I looked like an ostrich, that I had small eyes, and that I was dirty. I too wanted to point out that she looked like a pig, that she had a fat face, and that she too was unbelievably dirty. But I could only smile, pretending to feel offended. I had been greatly impressed by my sister’s bravery, but it still had not become integrated in me. Seeing that I had lost, my sister, satisfied, continued her stories about school.

 Looking back now, I believe that everyone steps into their own five-dimensional world in some point in life, because it is only in this realm that a person matures. My sister still rules the family, and her actions still teach me bravery. Though I have not completely learned my lessons, I am confident that my sister will make me into an independent individual.


© Copyright 2019 Linus Le Leon. All rights reserved.

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