A Response to the film 'Cria Cuervos'

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
A response to the film 'Cria Cuervos' , written for my Film Literature class in College. Please note a particular attention to the theme of 'Self' consciously noted in every film watched during the semester.

Submitted: September 29, 2014

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Submitted: September 29, 2014

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Cria Cuervos Film Response:

To appreciate the success of this film, you really have to recognize the methods by which a feeling of suffocated youth is conveyed, of which no other film I’ve ever seen has been able to compare. Two things are painfully clear about the story; the first is that while age may be a factor, the children are clearly the adults and the adults conversely are the children. The constant lies and deceit relentlessly highlight the ineptitude of a group of clearly educated and yet dysfunctional upper class people. Additionally it would seem that the adults are incapable of their duties and following the rules, while the children excuse themselves from the table and help clean the house. Thrown into the mix is a clear sexual undertone that entwines itself within the adult world and the children’s. Yet what strikes you first is not the subject of promiscuity or infidelity, but instead the way in which the theme intricately weaves within two worlds, affecting both in way that brilliantly pulls the two ages together. A perfect example would be, Ana and her sisters playing at the country house and then of course the unavoidable sighting of her father and a married women together in the bushes. This dramatic juxtaposing of the beauty of innocence cut short by the harsh realities of life. In fact, it is the repetition of events that truly emphasizes the struggle of these girls. In the end it would seem they couldn’t distinguish who they’re supposed to be or how they’re supposed to be, perfectly illustrated by the scenes in the garden. What I found particularly powerful, was the elder daughter on her bike riding in circles. Somehow I got this overwhelming sense that even if she were taken to a park, she wouldn’t know how to leave the pattern. None of the children understood how to be kids and most importantly the freedom of youth. Nothing was more distressing than seeing Ana emotionless, staring once again at another moment in her life that should have never been, and me asking whether she was overwhelmed or at this point just desensitized.

Louis Shaw

 


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