A Response to the film 'Never Let Me Go'

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
A response to the film 'Never Let Me Go' , written for my Film Literature class in College. Please note a particular attention to the theme of 'Self' consciously noted in every film watched during the semester.

Submitted: September 29, 2014

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Submitted: September 29, 2014

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NEVER LET ME GO: FILM RESPONSE

Never let me go was another fascinating story. I felt depressed after it finished, but also seemingly a strange sense of fortune. Both the film and the book ask so many questions, but there’s only one you really want to ask yourself, are we all truly in control of our own destinies? Or, as the case may be, do we often choose to no remain voiceless, and follow the path set? Sure there are many decisions to be made, numerous avenues to go down, but in the end it seems that whether we have a set lifespan or the freedom of not fully knowing, does it make a big difference if we have set purposes? Do we judge the lives of these characters based on the logic that theirs appear to be worse than ours and therefore ‘bad’? Is it merely our perspective? It would seem that the story looks to address one of the most important aspects of life. Reading through several articles on ‘Ishiguro’ after we watched the film, I was fascinated with his idea of ‘willful ignorance’. The idea that, knowing their fate, they still chose to ignore the questions they really wanted to ask. Perhaps in a less dramatic sense, they believe as a lot of us do, that ignorance is bliss. Why ask the questions that give us the answers we don’t want. In a bigger way, there is a huge emphasis on the entirety of society and not just the individual. When confronted with a conflicting power greater than ours, do we not chose to remain submissive, knowing that there’s a strong chance they can’t be beaten? We’re almost happy to remain passive, follow the rules. At any time, any of these characters could run away, if not completely disappear; they could certainly choose to explore more than the cottages and the surrounding area. So why do they choose to remain captive, why do they choose to visit the carcass of a boat, rather than the real thing? I came to the realization that it might just be the same way none of us really change. We feel that we want to, but it almost seems too difficult, too scary, perhaps it wont be what we want it to be and therefore the illusion seems better than reality. So in the end, we opt for clone existence.

Louis Shaw

 


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