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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic
This is more of a blog than anything else. I only submitted it as an article because hardly anyone reads 'miscellaneous' and I think this comes pretty close to being an article... or column... I don't know. But please, read on!

Submitted: October 24, 2012

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Submitted: October 24, 2012

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There aren't many times in my life that haven't involved writing in some respect. From staying at home with my mother when I was too young to attend school and preparing stories to entertain myself, to using the hundreds of promising pages of Harry Potter novels as ways to escape my surroundings just for a little while, I've always had a close relationship with English literature and a deep admiration for the stories that can make me laugh or cry, well really just for any story that was good enough to make the print. I've started a blog to document my journey from an aspirational amateur to, hopefully, a published author in an interview with Ellen Degeneres promoting my latest international best-seller. Here's hoping!
In fact, today on the 24th of October, 2012, I was published... in an anthology that is. An anthology is a collection of stories, poems or quotes that are written by different writers and collaborated to form one book. Through school with five other girls from my class, I entered a writing competition called 'Written portraits: portraits written in words'. I suppose it might speak for itself, and my story 'Crisp Morning' won a place in this publication much to my delight.
Going through the anthology, however, I realised just how inadequate my story must have seemed! I had no idea I was up against H.S.C students (grade 11-12 students that are doing their final school exams), who used words such as 'ubiquitous' and 'pulchritudinous'. What do they even mean? Furthermore, what are sixteen/eighteen-year-old's doing wrapping their tongues around such ridiculously obscure words? The largest word I used in my entry would probably be 'anxious', which is a word that everyone can pronounce and recognise (hopefully). It isn't the largest word I used in my story because I don't know any grander, more impressive words, but simply because these words were not needed. I was just blown away by the vocabulary of the winners and other writers, and it begs the question: Do 'big' words make you seem more mature? Will using an unusual word in a sentence make you seem more intelligent?
Yes, it has occurred to me that they more than likely had a spectacularly accurate thesaurus handy when they wrote their entries, and I am really curious as to where they found most of the synonyms for 'omnipresent' and 'beautiful'. I mean really, are those words not enough? Beautiful is a beautiful word, it's perfectly perfect for describing a woman, if used in a fitting poetic context.
Another thing that bugged me was the content and theme of many of the stories! I must've missed the notification for the prompt: death. It's a little bit scary when the majority of forty-six 13-18 year old's can conjure up a tale about suicide, heart attacks and murder. Where have the days gone, when this stage in life was far too young to even see the thigh of a woman's leg? Where is the innocence, the hope, the childlike creativity that brings to life whole new worlds and makes anything possible?
My Advice:
I may not be authorised to be giving out advice on writing as I am still learning myself, but in my lifetime of reading and writing I have picked up on a few things that I think writers should be wary of, if you would care to heed my warnings: See, I believe short stories are enjoyable, brief insights into somebody's life to read about on your way to work. It's an enlightening experience, but one that should remain quick and mysterious, sticking with the often proven fact that less is more. I don't understand the point of describing the features of the main character, unless something about them is important or significant to the story or if the colour of their jackets are symbolic to their personalities, emotions and/or situations. I don't understand the point of telling us who they hate or like at school/work if those characters are not in the story at all. I know it sounds silly, but I have read many stories that make this mistake. Stick to descriptions of surroundings, of thoughts and emotions and of the plot! Be careful not to get sidetracked, it's hard to get back to the main point of fighting a dragon if you're going on about how handsome the top villager Viking warrior is... well, you get my point.
But I'm proud of my story, if you'd like to read it I have it posted on this site named 'Crisp Morning'. 
Please leave feedback, I would love to hear your thoughts on what I have written here, negative or positive, I'd love to consider your opinion!


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