Walking the Path of Darkness

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Religion and Spirituality  |  House: Spiritual Messages
We fear the night full of terrors. Yet there's darkness far more profound than we pay no attention to. Far more sinister, it brings death without the aid of a sword.

Submitted: July 21, 2019

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Submitted: July 21, 2019

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We fear the dark.

Children hide under the bedcovers in fear of the bogeyman or the poltergeist in the closet.

Adults see the night as foreign, a mysterious gate that allows all evil creatures to emerge to haunt their dreams and steal their souls. Some fear the night so much they, force themselves to stay awake just in case Poe's raven might alight on the bust over the door. They must use the brightest lights to illuminate the darkest corners of every room. The softness of a night light is welcome as they can find the way to the bathroom without stubbing a toe on an object they swear wasn't there yesterday.

During the years leading up to the second world war, Jews were in constant fear that the Gestapo might come knocking down the door and cart them away to Auschwitz where more terrors awaited.

No surprise then that we build homes t be a barrier to marauding night creatures. Xenomorphs seize the unwary for incubation purposes. The night is full of terrors, so we must build bonfires to drive away from the ghouls and wolves that haunt us. The night equates to death. Like death, deep slumber offers no awareness, which gives us reason to treasure light. Ghosts never appear in bright sunshine.

We need light. We crave it because we feel comfortable in the surroundings we can see. In the dark, we feel lost even if we stood on a sandy beach. It's the familiarity that makes us feel comfortable.

As a child, I had nightmares of witches looking to eat me for supper. Rampaging elephants chased me with a mad lust to crush me under their massive hoofs. I woke to the mournful tune of a night train carrying souls to a fiery doom. I woke to see Freddy Kruger sitting at the edge of my bed with a bloody kitchen knife in hand while a gleeful smile, ready to carve me up just for fun of doing so. How I screamed! Papa arrived to assure me that it was just a nightmare. Nothing to worry about but my dream seemed so real, even as Freddy disappeared into the ether.

How ironic that we fear darkness so much! Yet we find a fascination in those same dark places. Hollywood has become wealthy with tales of horror, the macabre and Hell. Even Michael Jackson took up the fascination with his bestseller Thriller. Come November 30; every child dresses up in ghoulish costumes to haunt their peers with an ultimatum: Candy or your life!

While the fear of the night may weigh heavily upon us, we don't realize that we carry the night with us through daylight hours too. Only that darkness resides in the mind. It's the darkness of ignorance, a darkness that stifles creativity and limits us to believe in lies and half-truths we grew up with. We accept what we were taught to accept as reality. Christ warned us that what we believe to be the truth is, in fact, a fallacy. He said that all of us have lived in darkness all our lives. It isn't so much the darkness that comes every twenty-four hours that holds us in fear; it's our acceptance of the dark residing in our minds. We see it as enlightenment.

We've come to accept this world as reality. We focus our attention on the darkness of greed, selfishness, and envy. We fear the spiritual principles that would bring us out from under the barrel where wisdom resides.

Which is worse?

The imaginary dark things in the closet or the beast residing in the deep corners of our mind?

If we saw the light of a spiritual Rennaisance, we would have fewer problems living in fear of s Poltergeists rapping on our window panes.

We have a fascination with death. We fear to die. Perhaps we do because we find some comfort in it. Spiritually, the darkness helps us hide our insecurities and sins. If we can't see our human faults, we don't need to correct them. We can ignore the need to perfect our character. We can continue to be suspicious of anyone who possesses a different culture, language, or faith.

The night of ignorance is blissful. Comfortable. But ignorance is not bliss when the light of truth shines on it.

The fantasy of Hollywood is mere entertainment. The bogeyman on Elm street is fictitious.

The night we should fear most is the one that resides in the soul. We would turn away from it in disgust if we knew that living in that darkness would never bring happiness, nor peace.

 

 

 


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A Harvest of Thorns

Two worlds must deal with unique but related problems before they face complete annihilation.

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