A Camel Called Chocolate

Reads: 480  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 1  | Comments: 0

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Travel  |  House: Booksie Classic
What's it like to ride a camel - well let me enlighten you.

Submitted: February 04, 2016

A A A | A A A

Submitted: February 04, 2016

A A A

A A A


A Camel called Chocolate.

You can’t visit Morocco and not have a camel ride; that’s like going to London and not riding a red bus!  Yes it’s touristy and there is a risk you may end up on ‘You’ve Been Framed’, but it has got to be done.

 

Agadir in Morocco probably isn’t the most obvious destination for ‘un-seasoned’ travellers like my family and I, but it was April and we wanted a suntan, so closer to home locations just would not do.  It was a good choice.  Warm days and cool evenings, the perfect weather.  It was during one of these balmy evenings that my youngest child persuaded her slightly inebriated father, to clamber aboard ‘Chocolate’ the gorgeous, if a tad smelly, camel.

 

Camels are really quite remarkable creatures, growing to six or seven feet when fully grown, everything about them is big – dinner plate sized feet, long necks and big heads.  But their reputation for being grumpy and aggressive is unjustified – they are usually gentle, intelligent and patient, Chocolate being no exception.

 

Once I had got over my hysterical laughter at my husband bobbing along, clinging on for dear life, it was my turn.  The owner of Chocolate, dressed in traditional Berber clothing of blue robes and long turban, was clearly used to tourists and humoured my British awkwardness of mounting a dromedary in a somewhat un-ladylike fashion, Once atop (I rode with my other daughter and was sober!) and in the ‘saddle’, which I’m sure was a box over the camels hump but was nicely decorated with a colourful piece of material adorned with jingly bells, we held on tight.

 

Our guide instructed Chocolate to stand, this was slightly hair raising as the motion the camel makes when it’s rising to a stand – very slowly and two legs and a time – makes you feel like you’re going to end up in a heap..  But once we got going and got into the plodding rhythm of the camel we started to enjoy the view.

 

Palm trees and cacti line the streets of Agadir, as do vibrant tropical flowers with their intense colours, King Mohammed VI palace is suitably lush with its deep green foliage blocking any prying eyes.  Orange trees bearing fruit bordered the pathways in our hotel grounds and were in easy picking reach on a camel!  The architecture of Agadir is relatively new as sadly an earthquake destroyed most of the city in 1960, but the white buildings set against the brilliant blue skies still look attractive.  And you don’t need to be on a camel to view the local mountain – all 236m of it.

 

All too soon our lumbering tour comes to a stop and we have the daunting ‘landing’ to endure.  But we make it off in one piece and we thank our man with a few extra dirhams and Chocolate with a pat on the neck, he glances at us and I’m sure if he could roll his eyes he would have.


© Copyright 2020 Nicola Macbeth. All rights reserved.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

Add Your Comments: