Stuber

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
The following is a movie review “Stuber” by Marc Primo.

Release date: 12 July 2019 (USA)
Director: Michael Dowse
Language: English
Production Companies: 20th Century Fox, GoldDay Productions
Producers: jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley

Submitted: August 26, 2019

A A A | A A A

Submitted: August 26, 2019

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Stuber

The following is a movie review “Stuber” by Marc Primo.

Release date: 12 July 2019 (USA)

Director: Michael Dowse

Language: English

Production Companies: 20th Century Fox, GoldDay Productions

Producers: jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley

 

There have been several ride-along movies in recent years but only a few have made a mark. Sadly, the latest one in Stuber doesn’t have enough gas to accelerate the Uber culture into a film-worthy subject.

 

Perhaps it’s too early to place Dave Bautista (Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 1 and 2, Blade Runner 2049, Avengers Infinity War and Endgame) in a leading role. While he can be charismatic, his comedic timing and overall delivery are as overacted as when he was with the WWE.

 

Bautista plays the role of Vic Manning, a temporarily sight-challenged cop due to a botched Lasik procedure, who is on the chase for a drug-dealing, cop-killer named Oka Tedjo (Iko Uwais) and has to resort to taking an Uber ride due to his condition. Enter Stu (Kumail Nanjiani), Vic’s Uber driver who is prone to anxiety attacks when subjected to high-octane chases and dangerous circumstances, but remains as polite as he can as per Uber standards. From there (and as how most of us would usually take an Uber ride), we already know where we are headed.

 

Unlike movies with a similar premise such as 2004’s Collateral or 2017’s A Taxi Driver, Stuber is as simple as it gets. The basic elements are there, the complications are easy to spot, and the film has a villain that will effectively put the underdog label to its protagonists. Both Bautista and Nanjiani fit their respective roles, but the poor writing doesn’t do much justice to their many exchanges. While some dialogues can be funny, their odd-couple chemistry is a little off the mark. Director Michael Dowse certainly did better in 2011’s Goon, where he weaved comedy and violence into believable fiction. In Stuber however, the comedy and gore merely fizzle into a lackluster action caper. Viewers will notice how the funny stuff wanes as the minutes go by.

 

But Dave Bautista and Kumail Nanjiani fans need not worry as the film does not diminish their respective star powers. The real danger is how Stuber might stereotype them into their roles as the tough yet confused strongman, and the sarcastic, nonchalant average Joe respectively. With a few good laughs and the standard formula in place, Stuber might have worked if not for some loose ends in its script and direction.

 

As the film concludes, viewers can still take something away from it in how both Vic and Stu eventually learn how to help each other as exact opposites. It’s a bro show that any guy will be able to relate to, and that’s about it. Just imagine taking an Uber ride, getting stuck in heavy traffic, and wanting to get off the vehicle as soon as possible. Watching the film would probably make you feel the same.


© Copyright 2020 Marc Primo Reviews. All rights reserved.

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