The Dogman Article

The Dogman Article The Dogman Article

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Status: Finished

Genre: Fantasy

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Summary

What is an Dogman?
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Summary

What is an Dogman?

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Submitted: May 25, 2015

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Submitted: May 25, 2015

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The Dogman
By
Rusty Nugent


Werewolf. Wolfman. Dogman. Dogheads. No matter what they are called, the eyewitnesses describe the same creature walking on two legs but with the head of a canine. But what is this creature? A werewolf? The creature that inspired the werewolf legend? A wolf that learned to walk on two legs?
Whatever they are, they have been written about, talked about and illustrated throughout history since antiquity. The modern sightings started in Michigan in 1987, thanks to an April Fools' Day joke song entitled, "The Legend" by a DJ named Steve Cook. The Thing was, callers didn't take it as a joke and described seeing a similar creature.
Ranging anywhere from 7 ft-10ft tall and weighing between 450 lbs to 750 lbs, they are described as being built like linebackers with the head of a wolf or dog that can- and does- walk on two legs as well as four.
Four years after the michigan song in Wisconsin, reporter Linda Godfrey began hearing about sightings of what people were calling, "The Beast of Bray Road" "The Wisconsin Werewolf" or  "The Bray Road Beast." A wolf-like creature walking upright, on two legs. One eyewitness observed it running down a full grown deer with ease.
To date, they have been seen in every state in the continental United States, Canada, Australia, Europe, and many other countries around the world.
In Biblical mythology, the city of Canaan (which in ancient Hebrew means canine) was home to many "dogheads" who roamed the city, eating human flesh. St. Christopher has been rumored to have been a doghead whose real name was Reprobus or "Reprobate" or "Scoundrel." According to legend, once he accepted the Christian faith, he changed his ways. He was also a Canaanite who was martyred in 251 in Asia Minor. That's a long life. Marco Polo wrote of  "Cynocephaly" or "dogheaded" men who grew spices on the island of Angamanain.  
Most people who see them have described a feeling that ranges from one of unease, fear, to outright maliciously evil. They have stated that they felt in fear for their lives or that they felt like prey. Hunters who have done so all their lives have actually given it up and no longer go into the forests.
Dogmen apparently have a fondness for dogs and will kill them. The biggest, most vicious guard dog is reduced to a whimpering, cowering mess when these things are around. They have been observed eating dogs in the middle of a country road. Cats also seem to be victims of their disturbing appetites. But they've never attacked a human. Have they?
Quite possibly. In the summer of 1980, according to a late night convenience store clerk, two police officers whom she knew on a first name basis, told her a tale about an entire family that had been slaughtered by something at a campground inside their RV. This incident as well as the mutilated body of a bowhunter took place in LBL, or the "Land Between The Lakes" on the Tennessee/Kentucky border. Their were, according to several anonymous police officers who were called to the scene, dozens of C.I.A., F.B.I. and every other alphabet group operating under the federal government.
There are several medieval woodcuts depicting werewolves or dogheads, such as the famous nineteenth century painting, "The Werewolves of Normandy" shows several of the creatures resting upright against a high wall. So, are dogmen werewolves?  Who knows? I've learned to keep an open mind and that we as a species don't know everything. There is always some bit of truth to any legend. How much can vary from legend to legend. Not all werewolf legends are sinister. In Finland they are depicted as protective and honorable, as well as in Ireland where kings would call them in as reinforcements to aid their armies in battle. I leave you with this quote, "The demon wolf is not evil, unless the man he bites is evil."

If you would like to know more about the "dogmen," I urge you to go to youtube.com and listen to the Dogman Encounters audio radio show or visit these websites:
www.dogmanecounters.com
www.michigandogman.com


© Copyright 2017 Rusty Nugent. All rights reserved.

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